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Nineteenth Century Biological Conditions on the High Central Plains

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  • Scott A. Carson
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    Abstract

    Little work has been done on the biological conditions for the US Central Plains. Throughout the late 19th and early 20th centuries, black and white statures in Nebraska increased with economic development, indicating that biological conditions improved as Nebraska’s output market and agricultural sectors embedded. Illustrating the importance of rural environments with stature growth, farm laborers were taller than common laborers. Urbanization and industrialization were significant in stature variation, and closer proximity to trade routes and waterways were inversely related with statures in Nebraska.

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    File URL: http://www.cesifo-group.de/portal/page/portal/DocBase_Content/WP/WP-CESifo_Working_Papers/wp-cesifo-2012/wp-cesifo-2012-04/cesifo1_wp3807.pdf
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    Paper provided by CESifo Group Munich in its series CESifo Working Paper Series with number 3807.

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    Date of creation: 2012
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    Handle: RePEc:ces:ceswps:_3807

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    Keywords: agricultural development; black and white biological conditions;

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    1. Lee A. Craig & Thomas Weiss, 1997. "Nutritional Status and Agricultural Surpluses in the Antebellum United States," NBER Historical Working Papers 0099, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Gary D. Libecap & Zeynep Kocabiyik Hansen, 2000. ""Rain Follows the Plow" and Dryfarming Doctrine: The Climate Information Problem and Homestead Failure in the Upper Great Plains, 1890-1925," NBER Historical Working Papers 0127, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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