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Welfare Policy and the Distribution of Hours of Work

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  • L. Rachel Ngai
  • Christopher A. Pissarides

Abstract

We examine the distribution of hours of work across industrial sectors in OECD countries. We find large disparities when sectors are divided into three groups: one that produces goods without home substitutes and two others that have home substitutes — health and social work, and all others. We attribute the disparities to the countries' tax and subsidy policies. High taxation substantially reduces hours in sectors that have close home substitutes but less so in other sectors. Health and social care subsidies increase hours in that sector. We compute these effects for nineteen OECD countries.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Centre for Economic Performance, LSE in its series CEP Discussion Papers with number dp0962.

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Date of creation: Dec 2009
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Handle: RePEc:cep:cepdps:dp0962

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Web page: http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/publications/series.asp?prog=CEP

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Keywords: hours of work; employment shares; home production; childcare; tax wedge; welfare state; social subsidies;

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References

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  1. L. Rachel Ngai & Christopher A. Pissarides, 2006. "Trends in Hours and Economic Growth," CEP Discussion Papers dp0746, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  2. Blundell, Richard & Pashardes, Panos & Weber, Guglielmo, 1993. "What Do We Learn About Consumer Demand Patterns from Micro Data?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 83(3), pages 570-97, June.
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  6. L. Rachel Ngai & Christopher Pissarides, 2007. "Structural change in a multi-sector model of growth," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 4468, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
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  16. Peter Rupert & Richard Rogerson & Randall Wright, 1994. "Estimating substitution elasticities in household production models," Staff Report 186, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
  17. Yongsung Chang & Frank Schorfheide, 2002. "Labor-Supply Shifts and Economic Fluctuations," Macroeconomics 0204005, EconWPA.
  18. Pierre Cahuc & Yann Algan, 2009. "Civic Virtue and Labor Market Institutions," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 1(1), pages 111-45, January.
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Cited by:
  1. Francesca Bastagli & John Hills, 2013. "What gives? Household consumption patterns and the ‘Big Trade Off’ with public consumption," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 51275, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

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