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Adoption of New Technology

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  • Hall, Bronwyn H.
  • Khan, Beethika

Abstract

The contribution of new technology to economic growth can only be realized when and if the new technology is widely diffused and used. Diffusion itself results from a series of individual decisions to begin using the new technology, decisions which are often the result of a comparison of the uncertain benefits of the new invention with the uncertain costs of adopting it. An understanding of the factors affecting this choice is essential both for economists studying the determinants of growth and for the creators and producers of such technologies. Section II of this article discusses the modeling of diffusion and Sections III to V explore the determinants of diffusion and the evidence for their importance.

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Paper provided by Department of Economics, Institute for Business and Economic Research, UC Berkeley in its series Department of Economics, Working Paper Series with number qt3wg4p528.

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Date of creation: 03 May 2003
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Handle: RePEc:cdl:econwp:qt3wg4p528

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Keywords: technology adoption; diffusion; network goods; technological standards; real options;

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