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Measuring Systemic Importance of Financial Institutions: An Extreme Value Theory Approach

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  • Toni Gravelle
  • Fuchun Li

Abstract

In this paper, we define a financial institution’s contribution to financial systemic risk as the increase in financial systemic risk conditional on the crash of the financial institution. The higher the contribution is, the more systemically important is the institution for the system. Based on relevant but different measurements of systemic risk, we propose a set of market-based measures on the systemic importance of financial institutions, each designed to capture certain aspects of systemic risk. Multivariate extreme value theory approach is used to estimate these measures. Using six big Canadian banks as the proxy for Canadian banking sector, we apply these measures to identify systemically important banks in Canadian banking sector and major risk contributors from international financial institutions to Canadian banking sector. The empirical evidence reveals that (i) the top three banks, RBC Financial Group, TD Bank Financial Group, and Scotiabank are more systemically important than other banks, although with different order from different measures, while we also find that the size of a financial institution should not be considered as a proxy of systemic importance; (ii) compared to the European and Asian banks, the crashes of U.S. banks, on average, are the most damaging to the Canadian banking sector, while the risk contribution to the Canadian banking sector from Asian banks is quite lower than that from banks in U.S. and euro area; (iii) the risk contribution to the Canadian banking sector exhibits “ home bias ”, that is, cross-country risk contribution tends to be smaller than domestic risk contribution.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Bank of Canada in its series Working Papers with number 11-19.

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Length: 44 pages
Date of creation: 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:bca:bocawp:11-19

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Related research

Keywords: Financial stability; Financial system regulation and policies; Financial institutions; Econometric and statistical methods;

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  1. Philipp Hartmann & Stefan Straetmans & Casper de Vries, 2007. "Banking System Stability. A Cross-Atlantic Perspective," NBER Chapters, in: The Risks of Financial Institutions, pages 133-192 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Jorge A. Chan-Lau & Srobona Mitra & Li L. Ong, 2007. "Contagion Risk in the International Banking System and Implications for London As a Global Financial Center," IMF Working Papers 07/74, International Monetary Fund.
  3. Chen Zhou, 2009. "Are banks too big to fail?," DNB Working Papers 232, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department.
  4. Renzo G. Avesani & Jing Li & Antonio Garcia Pascual, 2006. "A New Risk Indicator and Stress Testing tool," IMF Working Papers 06/105, International Monetary Fund.
  5. Dennis Jansen & Casper de Vries, 1988. "On the frequency of large stock returns: putting booms and busts into perspective," Working Papers 1989-006, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
  6. Lehar, Alfred, 2005. "Measuring systemic risk: A risk management approach," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 29(10), pages 2577-2603, October.
  7. Ser-Huang Poon, 2004. "Extreme Value Dependence in Financial Markets: Diagnostics, Models, and Financial Implications," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 17(2), pages 581-610.
  8. S. T. M. Straetmans & W. F. C. Verschoor & C. C. P. Wolff, 2008. "Extreme US stock market fluctuations in the wake of 9|11," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 23(1), pages 17-42.
  9. Helmut Elsinger & Alfred Lehar & Martin Summer, 2006. "Systemically important banks: an analysis for the European banking system," International Economics and Economic Policy, Springer, vol. 3(1), pages 73-89, April.
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