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The Impact of Social Activities on Cognitive Ageing: Evidence From Eleven European Countries

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  • Loretti Dobrescu

    ()
    (School of Economics and ARC Centre of Excellence in Population Ageing Research, Australian School of Business, University of New South Wales)

  • Dimitris Christelis

    ()
    (CSEF, Dept. of Economics, University of Naples Federico II)

Abstract

Using micro data from eleven European countries, we investigate the impact of being socially active on cognition in older age. Cognitive abilities are measured through scores on numeracy, fluency and recall tests. We address the endogeneity of social activities through panel data and instrumental variable methods. We find that social activities have an important positive effect on cognition, with the results varying by gender. Fluency is positively affected only in females, while numeracy only in males. Finally, recall is affected in both sexes. We also show that social activities, through their effect on cognition, influence positively households’ economic welfare.

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File URL: http://cepar.edu.au/media/93532/07_the_impact_of_social_activities_on_cognitive_ageing_-_updated_copy_for_website.pdf
File Function: First version, 2012
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by ARC Centre of Excellence in Population Ageing Research (CEPAR), Australian School of Business, University of New South Wales in its series Working Papers with number 201207.

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Length: 43 pages
Date of creation: Oct 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:asb:wpaper:201207

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Keywords: Cognition; Ageing; Social Activities; SHARE; Panel Data;

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  1. Rivers, Douglas & Vuong, Quang H., 1988. "Limited information estimators and exogeneity tests for simultaneous probit models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 39(3), pages 347-366, November.
  2. Agar Brugiavini & Tullio Jappelli & Guglielmo Weber, 2002. "The Survey on Health, Aging and Wealth," CSEF Working Papers 86, Centre for Studies in Economics and Finance (CSEF), University of Naples, Italy.
  3. James Banks & Cormac O'Dea & Zoë Oldfield, 2010. "Cognitive Function, Numeracy and Retirement Saving Trajectories," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 120(548), pages F381-F410, November.
  4. Adeline Delavande & Susann Rohwedder & Robert Willis, 2008. "Preparation for Retirement, Financial Literacy and Cognitive Resources," Working Papers wp190, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center.
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  1. Social Participation and Cognition Later in Life
    by UDADISI in UDADISI on 2012-09-26 12:27:00

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