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Survey Evidence On Producer Use And Costs Of Genetically Modified Seed

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  • McBride, William D.
  • Books, Nora

Abstract

National survey data collected for 1997 in USDA's Agricultural Resource Management Study was used to derive implications and pose hypotheses about the impact on pesticide use, production practices, and producer costs of using genetically modified (GM) seed in soybean and cotton production. Results of the analysis suggest concurrence with scientific and industry claims about the environmental qualities of these technologies. Herbicide treatments on herbicide-resistant acreage were, on average, less than on other acreage, with more of the treatments in post-emergent applications. The mean value of insecticide treatments for target pests on Bt cotton acreage was reduced relative to other acreage with these pest problems. However, mean costs and mean yields on acreage planted in GM seed relative to other acreage did not indicate a cost advantage, or disadvantage, for the GM seed technologies. Additional research is needed to determine whether these suggested relationships hold when critical variables within aggregated groups are tested for their independent influence. [Econolit: Q000, O330] © 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Regional Research Project NE-165 Private Strategies, Public Policies, and Food System Performance in its series Proceedings:Transitions in Agbiotech: Economics of Strategy and Policy, June 24-25, 1999, Washington, D.C. with number 26009.

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Date of creation: 2000
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Handle: RePEc:ags:rpsniw:26009

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Postal: Draper Hall, College of Food and Natural Resources, Amherst, MA 01003
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Web page: http://www.umass.edu/ne165/
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Keywords: Crop Production/Industries;

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Cited by:
  1. Michel Fok & Marnus Gouse & Jean-Luc Hofs & Johann Kirsten, 2007. "Contextual appraisal of GM cotton diffusion in South Africa," Post-Print halshs-00176546, HAL.
  2. Lesser, William H. & Schmit, Todd M. & Ruiz, Lilian M., 1999. "Elite Germplasm For Gmo'S In Brazil: Modeling Government-Agribusiness Negotiations," International Food and Agribusiness Management Review, International Food and Agribusiness Management Association (IAMA), vol. 2(03/04).
  3. Demont, Matty & Tollens, Eric, 1999. "The Economics Of Agricultural Biotechnology: Historical And Analytical Framework," Working Papers 31845, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Centre for Agricultural and Food Economics.
  4. John C. Bernard & John D. Pesek, Jr. & Chunbo Fan, 2004. "Delaware farmers' adoption of GE soybeans in a time of uncertain U.S. adoption," Agribusiness, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(1), pages 81-94.
  5. Adhikari, Arun & Mishra, Ashok K. & Chintawar, Sachin, 2009. "Adoption of Technology and Its Impact on Profitability of Young and Beginning Farmers: A Quantile Regression Approach," 2009 Annual Meeting, January 31-February 3, 2009, Atlanta, Georgia 46830, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.
  6. Sylvie Bonny, 2011. "Herbicide-tolerant Transgenic Soybean over 15 Years of Cultivation: Pesticide Use, Weed Resistance, and Some Economic Issues. The Case of the USA," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 3(9), pages 1302-1322, August.
  7. Fernandez-Cornejo, Jorge & Wechsler, Seth James, 2011. "Revisiting the Impact of Bt Corn Adoption by U.S. Farmers," 2011 Annual Meeting, July 24-26, 2011, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 103327, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  8. Demont, Matty & Tollens, Eric, 2001. "Uncertainties Of Estimating The Welfare Effects Of Agricultural Biotechnology In The European Union," Working Papers 31828, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Centre for Agricultural and Food Economics.
  9. Traxler, Greg & Falck-Zepeda, Jose Benjamin & Sain, Gustavo, 2000. "Genes, Germplasm And Developing Country Access To Genetically Modified Crop Varieties," Proceedings:Transitions in Agbiotech: Economics of Strategy and Policy, June 24-25, 1999, Washington, D.C. 25997, Regional Research Project NE-165 Private Strategies, Public Policies, and Food System Performance.
  10. Corinne Alexander & Rachael E. Goodhue, 2002. "The pricing of innovations: An application to specialized corn traits," Agribusiness, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(3), pages 333-348.
  11. Marion Desquilbet & David S. Bullock, 2003. "Who Pays the Costs of Non-GMO Segregation and Identity Preservation?," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 91(3), pages 656-672.

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