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Who Pays the Costs of Non-GMO Segregation and Identity Preservation?

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  • Marion Desquilbet
  • David S. Bullock

Abstract

Our aim is to explore who pays the costs and who reaps the benefits of maintaining a dual-market system of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) and non-GMOs. We analyze the welfare effects of the introduction of consumer “hatred” given GMO technology and the introduction of GMO technology given hatred. Making alternative assumptions of competitive and then monopolistic supply, we recognize that identity preservation (IP) of non-GMOs creates costs for IP and non-IP producers. We model these costs as depending on the sizes of the two supply channels. Copyright 2003, Oxford University Press.

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/j.1467-8276.2009.01262.x
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Agricultural and Applied Economics Association in its journal American Journal of Agricultural Economics.

Volume (Year): 91 (2003)
Issue (Month): 3 ()
Pages: 656-672

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Handle: RePEc:oup:ajagec:v:91:y:2003:i:3:p:656-672

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References

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  1. Bullock, D. S. & Desquilbet, M., 2002. "The economics of non-GMO segregation and identity preservation," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 27(1), pages 81-99, February.
  2. McBride, William D. & Books, Nora, 2000. "Survey Evidence On Producer Use And Costs Of Genetically Modified Seed," Proceedings:Transitions in Agbiotech: Economics of Strategy and Policy, June 24-25, 1999, Washington, D.C. 26009, Regional Research Project NE-165 Private Strategies, Public Policies, and Food System Performance.
  3. Giannakas, Konstantinos & Fulton, Murray, 2002. "Consumption effects of genetic modification: what if consumers are right?," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 27(2), pages 97-109, August.
  4. Mayer, Holly & Furtan, W. H., 1999. "Economics of transgenic herbicide-tolerant canola: The case of western Canada," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 24(4), pages 431-442, August.
  5. Desquilbet, Marion & Lemarie, Stephane & Levert, Fabrice, 2002. "Potential Adoption of Genetically Modified Rapeseed in France, Effects on Revenues of Farmers and Upstream Companies: an ex ante evaluation," 2002 International Congress, August 28-31, 2002, Zaragoza, Spain 24975, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
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Cited by:
  1. Sobolevsky, Andrei & Moschini, GianCarlo & Lapan, Harvey E., 2002. "Genetically Modified Crop Innovations and Product Differentiation: Trade and Welfare Effects in the Soybean Complex," Staff General Research Papers 10098, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  2. Marion Desquilbet & Sylvaine Poret, 2014. "How do GM/non GM coexistence regulations affect markets and welfare?," European Journal of Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 37(1), pages 51-82, February.
  3. Skevas, Theodoros & Fevereiro, Pedro & Wesseler, Justus, 2010. "Coexistence regulations and agriculture production: A case study of five Bt maize producers in Portugal," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(12), pages 2402-2408, October.
  4. Nielsen, Chantal Pohl & Robinson, Sherman & Thierfelder, Karen, 2002. "Trade in genetically modified food," TMD discussion papers 106, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).

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