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Obesity Rates in OECD Countries: An International Perspective

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  • Loureiro, Maria L.
  • Nayga, Rodolfo M., Jr.

Abstract

Obesity is a growing concern. New World Health Organization (WHO) figures indicate that obesity is spreading around the world as a "global epidemic." According to the WHO, there are more people suffering overweight related problems than malnutrition. Globally there are more than 1 billion adults who are overweight and at least 300 million of them are clinically obese, while 800 million suffer malnutrition (WHO 2004). The body mass index (BMI) is a common and accepted measure to report obesity rates (see WHO 1997). BMI is measured as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared. Recommended BMI levels are generally between a numerical value of 20 and 25. An individual with a BMI between 25 and 30 is considered overweight, while an individual with a BMI above 30 is considered obese. Individuals with BMIs below 20 are considered thin.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by European Association of Agricultural Economists in its series 2005 International Congress, August 23-27, 2005, Copenhagen, Denmark with number 24454.

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Date of creation: 2005
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Handle: RePEc:ags:eaae05:24454

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Keywords: Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety;

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  1. Kinsey, Jean D. & Mancino, Lisa, 2002. "Diet Quality And Calories Consumed: The Impact Of Being Hungrier, Busier And Eating Out," Working Papers 14324, University of Minnesota, The Food Industry Center.
  2. Tomas J. Philipson & Richard A. Posner, 1999. "The Long-Run Growth in Obesity as a Function of Technological Change," NBER Working Papers 7423, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Kan, Kamhon & Tsai, Wei-Der, 2004. "Obesity and risk knowledge," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(5), pages 907-934, September.
  4. Kenkel, D.S., 1988. "Health Behavior, Health Knowledge, And Schooling," Papers 10-88-3, Pennsylvania State - Department of Economics.
  5. Chou, Shin-Yi & Grossman, Michael & Saffer, Henry, 2004. "An economic analysis of adult obesity: results from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(3), pages 565-587, May.
  6. Anderson, Patricia M. & Butcher, Kristin F. & Levine, Phillip B., 2003. "Maternal employment and overweight children," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(3), pages 477-504, May.
  7. David M. Cutler & Edward L. Glaeser & Jesse M. Shapiro, 2003. "Why Have Americans Become More Obese?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 17(3), pages 93-118, Summer.
  8. Rodolfo Nayga, 2000. "Schooling, health knowledge and obesity," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(7), pages 815-822.
  9. Darius Lakdawalla & Tomas Philipson, 2002. "The Growth of Obesity and Technological Change: A Theoretical and Empirical Examination," NBER Working Papers 8946, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. James P. Smith, 1999. "Healthy Bodies and Thick Wallets: The Dual Relation between Health and Economic Status," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 13(2), pages 145-166, Spring.
  11. Jayachandran N. Variyam & James Blaylock & David Smallwood, 1996. "A Probit Latent Variable Model of Nutrition Information and Dietary Fiber Intake," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 78(3), pages 628-639.
  12. Tomas Philipson, 2001. "The world-wide growth in obesity: an economic research agenda," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 10(1), pages 1-7.
  13. Nayga, Rodolfo M., Jr., 1996. "Wife'S Labor Force Participation And Family Expenditures For Prepared Food, Food Prepared At Home, And Food Away From Home," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association, vol. 25(2), October.
  14. John Cawley, 2004. "The Impact of Obesity on Wages," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 39(2).
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Cited by:
  1. Huffman, Wallace E. & Huffman, Sonya Kostova & Tegene, Abebayehu & Rickertsen, Kyrre, 2006. "The Economics of Obesity-Related Mortality among High Income Countries," 2006 Annual Meeting, August 12-18, 2006, Queensland, Australia 25567, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
  2. Miller, J. Corey & Coble, Keith H., 2008. "An International Comparison of the Effects of Government Agricultural Support on Food Budget Shares," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 40(02), August.
  3. Pieroni, Luca & Salmasi, Luca, 2010. "Body weight and socio-economic determinants: quantile estimations from the British Household Panel Survey," MPRA Paper 26434, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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