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Doing Policy In The Lab! Options For The Future Use Of Model-Based Policy Analysis For Complex Decision-Making

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  • Happe, Kathrin
  • Balmann, Alfons

Abstract

For models to have an impact on policy-making, they need to be used. Exploring the relationships between policy models, model uptake and policy dynamics is the core of this article. What particular role can policy models play in the analysis and design of policies? Which factors facilitate (inhibit) the uptake of models by policy-makers? What are possible pathways to further develop modelling approaches to better meet the challenges facing agriculture today? In this paper, we address these issues from three different points of view, each of which should shed some light on the subject. The first point of view discusses models in the framework of complex adaptive systems and uncertainty. The second point of view looks at the dynamic interplay between policies and models using the example of modelling in agricultural economics. The third point of view addresses conditions for a successful application of models in policy analysis.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by European Association of Agricultural Economists in its series 107th Seminar, January 30-February 1, 2008, Sevilla, Spain with number 6588.

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Date of creation: 2008
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Handle: RePEc:ags:eaa107:6588

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Related research

Keywords: modelling; complexity; participatory modelling; policy analysis; model use; Agricultural and Food Policy; Research Methods/ Statistical Methods;

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  1. M Duijn & L.H Immers & F.A Waaldijk & H.J. Stoelhorst, 2003. "Gaming Approach Route 26: a Combination of Computer Simulation, Design Tools and Social Interaction," Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, vol. 6(3), pages 7.
  2. Tesfatsion, Leigh, 2006. "Agent-Based Computational Economics: A Constructive Approach to Economic Theory," Staff General Research Papers 12514, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  3. Happe, Kathrin, 2004. "Agricultural policies and farm structures: agent-based modelling and application to EU-policy reform," Studies on the Agricultural and Food Sector in Central and Eastern Europe, LeibĀ­niz Institute of Agricultural Development in Central and Eastern Europe (IAMO), volume 30, number 14945.
  4. Ana Maria Ramanath & Nigel Gilbert, 2004. "The Design of Participatory Agent-Based Social Simulations," Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, vol. 7(4), pages 1.
  5. David Colander, 2005. "What Economists Teach and What Economists Do," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(3), pages 249-260, July.
  6. Olivier Barreteau & Christophe Le Page & Patrick D'Aquino, 2003. "Role-Playing Games, Models and Negotiation Processes," Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, vol. 6(2), pages 10.
  7. David Colander, 2003. "Muddling through and policy analysis," New Zealand Economic Papers, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(2), pages 197-215.
  8. Janssen, Marco A. & Ostrom, Elinor, 2006. "Governing Social-Ecological Systems," Handbook of Computational Economics, in: Leigh Tesfatsion & Kenneth L. Judd (ed.), Handbook of Computational Economics, edition 1, volume 2, chapter 30, pages 1465-1509 Elsevier.
  9. Kathrin Happe, 2005. "Agricultural policies and farm structures - agent-based simulation and application to EU-policy reform," Others 0504011, EconWPA.
  10. Geurts, Jac. L. A. & Joldersma, Cisca, 2001. "Methodology for participatory policy analysis," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 128(2), pages 300-310, January.
  11. David Colander, 2000. "New Millennium Economics: How Did It Get This Way, and What Way Is It?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 14(1), pages 121-132, Winter.
  12. Bonnen, James T. & Schweikhardt, David B., 1997. "Getting From Economic Analysis To Policy Advice," Staff Papers 11618, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
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Cited by:
  1. Schilling, Chris & Kaye-Blake, William & Post, Elizabeth & Rains, Scott, 2012. "The importance of farmer behaviour: an application of Desktop MAS, a multi-agent system model for rural New Zealand communities," 2012 Conference, August 31, 2012, Nelson, New Zealand 136070, New Zealand Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.

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