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What Economists Teach and What Economists Do

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  • David Colander

Abstract

Fifty years ago what was taught in the principles of economics course reflected reasonably well what economists did in their research. That, however, is no longer the case; today what economists teach has a more nuanced relation to what they do. The reason is that the economics profession and the textbooks have evolved differently. The author addresses the implications of the changes that have occurred in the profession for the way economics is taught and the way economics is presented in the micro principles textbooks. First, he summarizes the changes he sees happening in the profession. Second, he discusses the stories that the principles textbooks tell in micro. Third, he discusses how those stories might change to reflect better what economists currently do.

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.3200/JECE.36.3.249-260
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal The Journal of Economic Education.

Volume (Year): 36 (2005)
Issue (Month): 3 (July)
Pages: 249-260

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Handle: RePEc:taf:jeduce:v:36:y:2005:i:3:p:249-260

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Cited by:
  1. Carlos Gustavo Machicado & Lourdes Espinoza & Katia Makhlouf, 2009. "La Enseñanza de Economía en Bolivia y Chile," IDB Publications 7657, Inter-American Development Bank.
  2. David Colander, 2009. "Moving Beyond the Rhetoric of Pluralism: Suggestions for an “Inside-the-Mainstream” Heterodoxy," Middlebury College Working Paper Series 0915, Middlebury College, Department of Economics.
  3. David Colander, 2007. "Pluralism and Heterodox Economics: Suggestions for an “Inside the Mainstream” Heterodoxy," Middlebury College Working Paper Series 0724, Middlebury College, Department of Economics.
  4. Carlos Gustavo Machado & Lourdes Espinoza & Katia Makhlouf, 2009. "La enseñanza de economía en Bolivia y Chile," Research Department Publications 4632, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
  5. Juan Luis Jiménez & Jordi Perdiguero & Ancor Suárez, 2011. "Debating as a classroom tool for adapting learning outcomes to the European higher education area," IREA Working Papers 201109, University of Barcelona, Research Institute of Applied Economics, revised Jun 2011.
  6. Green, Tom L., 2013. "Teaching (un)sustainability? University sustainability commitments and student experiences of introductory economics," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 94(C), pages 135-142.
  7. Happe, Kathrin & Balmann, Alfons, 2008. "Doing Policy In The Lab! Options For The Future Use Of Model-Based Policy Analysis For Complex Decision-Making," 107th Seminar, January 30-February 1, 2008, Sevilla, Spain 6588, European Association of Agricultural Economists.

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