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Do Limitations in Land Rights Transferability Influence Low Mobility Rates in Ethiopia?

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  • de Brauw, Alan
  • Mueller, Valerie

Abstract

Migration is considered a pathway out of poverty for many rural households in developing countries. National policies can discourage households from exploiting external employment opportunities through the distortion of capital markets. Studies in China show that the presence of state and collectively owned land creates inefficiencies in the labor market. We examine the extent restrictions on land rights impede mobility in Ethiopia, having the lowest urbanization rate in sub-Saharan Africa. The empirical estimates support a robust positive effect from increasing the transferability of land rights on migration. Our findings are suggestive that the nascent land certification and registration programs in regions of Ethiopia may potentially promote poverty reduction by increasing incentives to migrate.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Agricultural and Applied Economics Association in its series 2010 Annual Meeting, July 25-27, 2010, Denver, Colorado with number 60958.

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Date of creation: 2010
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Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea10:60958

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Related research

Keywords: International Development; Labor and Human Capital; Land Economics/Use;

References

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  1. Tomoko Harigaya & Alan de Brauw, 2004. "Seasonal Migration and Improving Living Standards in Vietnam," Department of Economics Working Papers 2004-10, Department of Economics, Williams College.
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Cited by:
  1. Dorosh, Paul & Thurlow, James, 2012. "Can Cities or Towns Drive African Development? Economy-wide Analysis for Ethiopia and Uganda," Working Paper Series UNU-WIDER Research Paper , World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  2. Valsecchi, Michele, 2010. "Land Certification and International Migration: Evidence from Mexico," Working Papers in Economics 440, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
  3. Gray, Clark & Mueller, Valerie, 2012. "Drought and Population Mobility in Rural Ethiopia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 134-145.
  4. de Brauw, Alan & Mueller, Valerie & Woldehanna, Tassew, 2013. "Does internal migration improve overall well-being in Ethiopia?:," ESSP working papers 55, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).

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