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Globalization and health worker crisis: what do wealth-effects tell us?

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  • Asongu Simplice

    ()
    (Yaoundé/Cameroun)

Abstract

Owing to lack of relevant data on health human resource (HHR) migration, the empirical dimension of the health-worker crisis debate has remained void despite abundant theoretical literature. A health worker crisis is overwhelming the world. Shortages in health professionals are reaching staggering levels in many parts of the globe. This paper complements existing literature by empirically investigating the WHO hypothetical determinants of health-worker migration in the context of globalization when income-levels matter. In plainer terms, the work explores how the wealth of exporting countries play-out in the determinants of HHR emigration. We assess the determinants of emigration in the health sector through-out the conditional distribution of health human resource emigration. Findings provide very targeted policy implications based on income-levels and existing emigration levels for both physician and nurse worker crises. Beside specific policy recommendations, we also outlined broad policy measures for source-countries, recipient-states and regional (international) institutions.

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File URL: http://www.afridev.org/RePEc/agd/agd-wpaper/Globalization-and-health-worker-crisis.-What-do-wealth-effects-tell-us.pdf
File Function: Revised version, 2013
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by African Governance and Development Institute. in its series Working Papers with number 12/023.

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Length: 37
Date of creation: 26 Mar 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:agd:wpaper:12/023

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Keywords: Welfare; Health; Human Capital; Migration;

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  1. Simplice A. Asongu, 2013. "Fighting Corruption when Existing Corruption-Control Levels Count: What do Wealth-Effects Tell us in Africa?," Institutions and Economies (formerly known as International Journal of Institutions and Economies), Faculty of Economics and Administration, University of Malaya, Faculty of Economics and Administration, University of Malaya, vol. 5(3), pages 53-74, October.
  2. Simplice A, Asongu, 2012. "Government quality determinants of stock market performance in African countries," MPRA Paper 39631, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  3. Koenker,Roger, 2005. "Quantile Regression," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521845731.
  4. Billger, Sherrilyn M. & Goel, Rajeev K., 2009. "Do existing corruption levels matter in controlling corruption?: Cross-country quantile regression estimates," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 90(2), pages 299-305, November.
  5. Okada, Keisuke & Samreth, Sovannroeun, 2012. "The effect of foreign aid on corruption: A quantile regression approach," Economics Letters, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 115(2), pages 240-243.
  6. Asongu Simplice, 2012. "Fighting corruption in Africa: do existing corruption-control levels matter?," Working Papers, African Governance and Development Institute. 12/012, African Governance and Development Institute..
  7. Ivar Kolstad & Espen Villanger, 2008. "Foreign Direct Investment in the Caribbean," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 26(1), pages 79-89, 01.
  8. Asongu Simplice, 2012. "Fighting corruption when existing corruption-control levels count : what do wealth effects tell us?," Working Papers, African Governance and Development Institute. 12/013, African Governance and Development Institute..
  9. Michael A. Clemens & Gunilla Pettersson, 2006. "A New Database of Health Professional Emigration from Africa," Working Papers, Center for Global Development 95, Center for Global Development.
  10. Simplice A, Asongu, 2012. "Fighting corruption with cultural dynamics: when legal-origins, religious-influences and existing corruption-control levels matter," MPRA Paper 36893, University Library of Munich, Germany.
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