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The Power of the Provisioning Concept

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  • Eran Binenbaum

    ()
    (School of Economics, University of Adelaide)

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    Abstract

    This paper supports the conception of economics as the social science that studies provisioning processes. Conceptions of economics help us understand the history of economic thought and have methodological, theoretical, policy and strategic significance. When economists are careful to define their discipline without committing ourselves a priori to particular assumptions, methods and theories, but as merely focusing on a class of phenomena, then the result is a more thoughtful and richer economics. The 'natural' choice for this class of phenomena is provisioning systems, because we want to understand as fully as possible the systems that nurture us– meaning that we ought to be interested in monetary and non-monetary mechanisms, self-interest as well as altruism, perfect rationality as well as quasi-rationality, exchange as well as gift relationships, etc., all as part of one discipline.

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    File URL: http://www.economics.adelaide.edu.au/research/papers/doc/wp2005-09.pdf
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by University of Adelaide, School of Economics in its series School of Economics Working Papers with number 2005-09.

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    Length: 21 pages
    Date of creation: 2005
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:adl:wpaper:2005-09

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    Postal: Adelaide SA 5005
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    Web page: http://www.economics.adelaide.edu.au/
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    Related research

    Keywords: provisioning; definition of economics; economic methodology; history of economic thought; scarcity; comparative paradigms in economics;

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    1. Amitai Etzioni, 2004. "The Post Affluent Society," Review of Social Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 62(3), pages 407-420.
    2. Rothschild, Kurt W., 1989. "Political economy or economics? : Some terminological and normative considerations," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 5(1), pages 1-12.
    3. Nelson, J.A., 1990. "Gender, Metaphor, And The Definition Of Economics," Papers 350, California Davis - Institute of Governmental Affairs.
    4. Hirshleifer, Jack, 1985. "The Expanding Domain of Economics," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 75(6), pages 53-68, December.
    5. Nelson, J.A., 1995. "Feminism, Ecology, and the Philosophy of Economics," Papers 95-12, California Davis - Institute of Governmental Affairs.
    6. Jochimsen, Maren & Knobloch, Ulrike, 1997. "Making the hidden visible: the importance of caring activities and their principles for any economy," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 20(2), pages 107-112, February.
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