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Removing Barriers to Work for Older Americans

In: A Future of Good Jobs? America's Challenge in the Global Economy

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This chapter was published in:

  • Timothy J. Bartik & Susan n. Houseman (ed.), 2008. "A Future of Good Jobs? America's Challenge in the Global Economy," Books from Upjohn Press, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, number fgj, December.
    This item is provided by W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research in its series Book chapters authored by Upjohn Institute researchers with number fgjch5.

    Handle: RePEc:upj:uchaps:fgjch5

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    Keywords: older workers;

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    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
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    1. Katherine G. Abraham & Susan N. Houseman, 2004. "Work and Retirement Plans among Older Americans," Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles 04-105, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
    2. Judith K. Hellerstein & David Neumark, 2004. "Production Function and Wage Equation Estimation with Heterogeneous Labor: Evidence from a New Matched Employer-Employee Data Set," NBER Working Papers 10325, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Alicia H. Munnell & Steven A. Sass, 2007. "The Labor Supply of Older Americans," Working Papers, Center for Retirement Research at Boston College wp2007-12, Center for Retirement Research, revised Jun 2007.
    4. Gary Burtless & Joseph F. Quinn, 2002. "Is Working Longer the Answer for an Aging Workforce?," Issues in Brief ib2002-11, Center for Retirement Research, revised Dec 2002.
    5. Frank A. Scott & John Garen & Mark Berger, 1995. "Do health insurance and pension costs reduce the job opportunities of older workers?," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 48(4), pages 775-791, July.
    6. David H. Autor & Mark G. Duggan, 2006. "The Growth in the Social Security Disability Rolls: A Fiscal Crisis Unfolding," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 20(3), pages 71-96, Summer.
    7. Alan Gustman & Thomas Steinmeier, 2007. "Projecting Behavioral Responses to the Next Generation of Retirement Policies," Working Papers wp153, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center.
    8. Katharine G. Abraham & James L. Medoff, 1984. "Length of service and layoffs in union and nonunion work groups," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 38(1), pages 87-97, October.
    9. Leora Friedberg & Anthony Webb, 2005. "Retirement and the Evolution of Pension Structure," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 40(2).
    10. Chan, Sewin & Stevens, Ann Huff, 2001. "Job Loss and Employment Patterns of Older Workers," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 19(2), pages 484-521, April.
    11. Joanna Lahey, 2006. "Age, Women, and Hiring: An Experimental Study," Working Papers, Center for Retirement Research at Boston College wp2006-23, Center for Retirement Research, revised Nov 2006.
    12. James L. Medoff & Katharine G. Abraham, 1981. "Are Those Paid More Really More Productive? The Case of Experience," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 16(2), pages 186-216.
    13. Joseph F. Quinn, 1999. "Has the Early Retirement Trend Reversed?," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 424, Boston College Department of Economics.
    14. Richard W. Johnson, 2007. "What Happens to Health Benefits after Retirement?," Work Opportunity Briefs wob_7, Center for Retirement Research, revised Feb 2007.
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    Cited by:
    1. Timothy J. Bartik & Susan N. Houseman, 2008. "Introduction and Overview," Book chapters authored by Upjohn Institute researchers, in: Timothy J. Bartik & Susan n. Houseman (ed.), A Future of Good Jobs? America's Challenge in the Global Economy, chapter 1, pages 1-16 W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
    2. Timothy J. Bartik & Susan n. Houseman (ed.), 2008. "A Future of Good Jobs? America's Challenge in the Global Economy," Books from Upjohn Press, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, number fgj, December.

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