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Leveraging Migration for Africa : Remittances, Skills, and Investments

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  • Dilip Ratha
  • Sanket Mohapatra
  • Caglar Ozden
  • Sonia Plaza
  • William Shaw
  • Abebe Shimeles

Abstract

International migration has profound implications for human welfare, and African governments have had only a limited influence on welfare outcomes, for good or ill. Improved efforts to manage migration will require information on the nature and impact of migratory patterns. This book seeks to contribute toward this goal, by reviewing previous research and providing new analyses (including surveys and case studies) as well as by formulating policy recommendations that can improve the migration experience for migrants, origin countries, and destination countries. The book comprises this introduction and summary and four chapters. Chapter one reviews the data on African migration and considers the challenges African governments face in managing migration. Chapter two discusses the importance of remittances, the most tangible link between migration and development; it also identifies policies that can facilitate remittance flows to Africa and increase their development impact. Chapter three analyzes high-skilled emigration and analyzes policies that can limit adverse implications and maximize positive implications for development. Chapter four considers ways in which Africa can leverage its diaspora resources to increase trade, investment, and access to technology.

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Bibliographic Info

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This book is provided by The World Bank in its series World Bank Publications with number 2300 and published in 2011.

ISBN: 978-0-8213-8257-8
Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbpubs:2300

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Postal: 1818 H Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20433
Phone: (202) 477-1234
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Web page: https://openknowledge.worldbank.org
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Related research

Keywords: Health; Nutrition and Population - Population Policies Communities and Human Settlements - Human Migrations & Resettlements Social Development - Voluntary and Involuntary Resettlement Macroeconomics and Economic Growth - Remittances Finance and Financial Sector Development - Access to Finance Health; Nutrition and Population;

References

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  1. Bevelander, Pieter & Pendakur, Ravi, 2009. "Citizenship, Co-ethnic Populations and Employment Probabilities of Immigrants in Sweden," IZA Discussion Papers, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) 4495, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Combes, Pierre-Philippe & Lafourcade, Miren & Mayer, Thierry, 2003. "Can Business and Social Networks Explain the Border Effect Puzzle?," CEPR Discussion Papers, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers 3750, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  3. John Bryant & David Law, 2004. "New Zealand’s Diaspora and Overseas-born Population," Treasury Working Paper Series, New Zealand Treasury 04/13, New Zealand Treasury.
  4. José Vicente Blanes Cristóbal, 2004. "Does Immigration Help to Explain Intra-Industry Trade? Evidence for Spain," Economic Working Papers at Centro de Estudios Andaluces, Centro de Estudios Andaluces E2004/29, Centro de Estudios Andaluces.
  5. Asish Arora & Alfonso Gambardella, 2004. "The Globalization of the Software Industry: Perspectives and Opportunities for Developed and Developing Countries," NBER Working Papers, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc 10538, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Ashok Deo Bardhan & Subhrajit Guhathakurta, 2004. "Global Linkages of Subnational Regions: Coastal Exports and International Networks," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, Western Economic Association International, vol. 22(2), pages 225-236, 04.
  7. Frédéric Docquier & Elisabetta Lodigiani, 2007. "Skilled Migration and Business Networks," Development Working Papers, Centro Studi Luca d\'Agliano, University of Milano 234, Centro Studi Luca d\'Agliano, University of Milano.
  8. Ben Dolman, 2008. "Migration, trade and investment," Staff Working Papers, Productivity Commission, Government of Australia 0803, Productivity Commission, Government of Australia.
  9. Catherine Co & Patricia Euzent & Thomas Martin, 2004. "The export effect of immigration into the USA," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(6), pages 573-583.
  10. Dunlevy, James A. & Hutchinson, William K., 1999. "The Impact of Immigration on American Import Trade in the Late Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Centuries," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge University Press, vol. 59(04), pages 1043-1062, December.
  11. José V. Blanes & Joan A. Martín-Montaner, 2006. "Migration Flows and Intra-Industry Trade Adjustments," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer, Springer, vol. 142(3), pages 567-584, October.
  12. Chiswick, Barry R, 1978. "The Effect of Americanization on the Earnings of Foreign-born Men," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, University of Chicago Press, vol. 86(5), pages 897-921, October.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Ousman Gajigo & Audrey Verdier‐Chouchane, 2014. "Working Paper 203 - Immigrants, Skills and Wages in the Gambian Labor Market," Working Paper Series, African Development Bank 2134, African Development Bank.
  2. Gnangnon, Sèna Kimm, 2014. "The Effect of Development Aid Unpredictability and Migrants’ Remittances on Fiscal Consolidation in Developing Countries," World Development, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 168-190.
  3. Alex Julca, 2013. "Can Immigrant Remittances Support Development Finance?," Panoeconomicus, Savez ekonomista Vojvodine, Novi Sad, Serbia, Savez ekonomista Vojvodine, Novi Sad, Serbia, vol. 60(3), pages 365-380, May.
  4. Blanca Moreno-Dodson & Sanket Mohapatra & Dilip Ratha, 2012. "Migration, Taxation, and Inequality," World Bank Other Operational Studies, The World Bank 10038, The World Bank.
  5. Ehrhart, Helene & Le Goff, Maelan & Rocher?, Emmanuel & Singh, Raju Jan, 2014. "Does migration foster exports ? evidence from Africa," Policy Research Working Paper Series, The World Bank 6739, The World Bank.
  6. Basu, Alaka M. & Basu, Kaushik, 2014. "The prospects for an imminent demographic dividend in Africa: The case for cautious optimism," Working Paper Series, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER) UNU-WIDER Research Paper , World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  7. Fransen, Sonja & Mazzucato, Valentina, 2014. "Remittances and Household Wealth after Conflict: A Case Study on Urban Burundi," World Development, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 57-68.

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