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Child nutritional status and child growth in Kenya: Socioeconomic determinants

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  • Anil B. Deolalikar

    (World Bank and the University of Washington, USA)

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    Abstract

    Reduced-form demand relations for weight, height and weight gain since birth are estimated using data on 7,907 children in Kenya. Maternal education is a significant determinant of all indicators, with secondary schooling having larger although not significantly different effects than primary schooling. Per capita household expenditure has highly significant but numerically small effects. Birth weight has a strong negative effect on subsequent weight gain. The effect becomes even more negative (indicating almost complete catch-up by age one) when birth weight is treated as an endogenous variable. These results indicate that small deficits in birth weight are not permanent.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. in its journal Journal of International Development.

    Volume (Year): 8 (1996)
    Issue (Month): 3 ()
    Pages: 375-393

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    Handle: RePEc:wly:jintdv:v:8:y:1996:i:3:p:375-393

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    Web page: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/5102/home

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    References

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    1. Jere Behrman & Victor Lavy, . "Child Health and Schooling Achievement: Association, Causality and Household Allocations," CARESS Working Papres 97-23, University of Pennsylvania Center for Analytic Research and Economics in the Social Sciences.
    2. Haddad, L. & Bouis, H.E., 1989. "The Impact of Nutritional Status on Agricultural Productivity: Wage Evidence from the Philippines," Papers 97, Warwick - Development Economics Research Centre.
    3. Thomas, Duncan & Strauss, John & Henriques, Maria-Helena, 1990. "Child survival, height for age and household characteristics in Brazil," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 197-234, October.
    4. McElroy, Marjorie B & Horney, Mary Jean, 1981. "Nash-Bargained Household Decisions: Toward a Generalization of the Theory of Demand," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 22(2), pages 333-49, June.
    5. Strauss, John & Thomas, Duncan, 1995. "Human resources: Empirical modeling of household and family decisions," Handbook of Development Economics, in: Hollis Chenery & T.N. Srinivasan (ed.), Handbook of Development Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 34, pages 1883-2023 Elsevier.
    6. Barrera, Albino, 1990. "The interactive effects of mother's scholling and unsupplemented breastfeeding on child health," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(1-2), pages 81-98, November.
    7. Strauss, John, 1986. "Does Better Nutrition Raise Farm Productivity?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 94(2), pages 297-320, April.
    8. Rosenzweig, Mark R & Schultz, T Paul, 1982. "Market Opportunities, Genetic Endowments, and Intrafamily Resource Distribution: Child Survival in Rural India," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 72(4), pages 803-15, September.
    9. Behrman, Jere R. & Deolalikar, Anil B., 1988. "Health and nutrition," Handbook of Development Economics, in: Hollis Chenery & T.N. Srinivasan (ed.), Handbook of Development Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 14, pages 631-711 Elsevier.
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    Cited by:
    1. Nicholson, Charles F. & Mwangi, Lucy & Staal, Steven J. & Thornton, Philip K., 2003. "Dairy Cow Ownership And Child Nutritional Status In Kenya," Research Bulletins 122122, Cornell University, Department of Applied Economics and Management.
    2. del Ninno, Carlo & Lundberg, Mattias, 2005. "Treading water: The long-term impact of the 1998 flood on nutrition in Bangladesh," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 3(1), pages 67-96, March.
    3. Outes, Ingo & Porter, Catherine, 2013. "Catching up from early nutritional deficits? Evidence from rural Ethiopia," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 11(2), pages 148-163.
    4. Takashi Yamano & Harold Alderman & Luc Christiaensen, 2005. "Child Growth, Shocks, and Food Aid in Rural Ethiopia," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 87(2), pages 273-288.
    5. Nicholson, Charles F. & Mwangi, Lucy & Staal, Steven J. & Thornton, Philip K., 2003. "Dairy Cow Ownership and Child Nutritional Status in Kenya," 2003 Annual meeting, July 27-30, Montreal, Canada 22154, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    6. Subha Mani, 2008. "Is there Complete, Partial, or No Recovery from Childhood Malnutrition? Empirical Evidence from Indonesia," Fordham Economics Discussion Paper Series dp2008-19, Fordham University, Department of Economics.
    7. José Martín & María Herrero & José Campillo, 2014. "An index of education and child health in the Horn of Africa," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 48(2), pages 863-870, March.
    8. Dercon, Stefan & Hoddinott, John, 2003. "Health, Shocks and Poverty Persistence," Working Paper Series UNU-WIDER Research Paper , World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).

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