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Rural-to-urban migration in LDCS: a test of two rival models

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  • Prabir C. Bhattacharya

    (Economics Division, School of Management, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh, UK)

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    Abstract

    This paper provides a test-using an India data set-of both the Todaro-type probabilistic models of migration and a distinctly different view of the labour migration process which sees the rural-urban migration flow as consisting of two distinct streams, with separate incentives-one group migrating to the informal sector where wages are competitively determined and the other group to the formal sector with jobs mostly prearranged (and with rural-urban migration not contributing to an increase in unemployment in any meaningful sense). The policy implications of this alternative view of the labour migration process are clearly substantially different from those derived from the Todaro and the Harris-Todaro-type models. The evidence presented in this paper are seen to support this alternative view. The paper also considers the role of the social factors in migration decisions and examines the extent to which the variables which explain the migration for employment also explain the migration behaviour of those who gave various reasons other than employment for migration. Copyright © 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. in its journal Journal of International Development.

    Volume (Year): 14 (2002)
    Issue (Month): 7 ()
    Pages: 951-972

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    Handle: RePEc:wly:jintdv:v:14:y:2002:i:7:p:951-972

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    Web page: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/5102/home

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    1. Williamson, Jeffrey G., 1988. "Migration and urbanization," Handbook of Development Economics, in: Hollis Chenery & T.N. Srinivasan (ed.), Handbook of Development Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 11, pages 425-465 Elsevier.
    2. Prabir C. Bhattacharya, 1996. "The role of the informal sector in structural transformation: Some Indian evidence," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 8(1), pages 83-94.
    3. Yap, Lorene Y. L., 1977. "The attraction of cities : A review of the migration literature," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 4(3), pages 239-264, September.
    4. Banerjee, Biswajit, 1983. "The Role of the Informal Sector in the Migration Process: A Test of Probabilistic Migration Models and Labour Market Segmentation for India," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 35(3), pages 399-422, November.
    5. Prabir C. Bhattacharya, 2000. "An analysis of rural-to-rural migration in India," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 12(5), pages 655-667.
    6. repec:ilo:ilowps:165354 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Prabir C. Bhattacharya, 1998. "Sector-specific sticky wages and wage subsidy: a note," Journal of Economic Studies, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 25(2), pages 124-128, May.
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    Cited by:
    1. Mahreen Mahmud & Tareena Musaddiq & Farah Said, 2010. "Internal Migration Patterns in Pakistan—The Case for Fiscal Decentralisation," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 49(4), pages 593–607.
    2. Benjamin, Nancy & Beegle, Kathleen & Recanatini, Francesca & Santini, Massimiliano, 2014. "Informal economy and the World Bank," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6888, The World Bank.
    3. Gonzalo Duran, 2005. "Subsidios de Educación: Impacto en la Migración y Convergencia Regional," Public Economics 0512007, EconWPA.
    4. Ingrid Dallmann & Katrin Millock, 2013. "Climate Variability and Internal Migration: A Test on Indian Inter-State Migration," Documents de travail du Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne 13045, Université Panthéon-Sorbonne (Paris 1), Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne.
    5. Bhattacharya, Prabir C., 2011. "Informal sector, income inequality and economic development," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(3), pages 820-830, May.
    6. Cornilius Chikwama, 2004. "Rural Off-Farm Employment and Farm Investment: An Analytical Framework and Evidence from Zimbabwe," CERT Discussion Papers 0403, Centre for Economic Reform and Transformation, Heriot Watt University.
    7. García-Díaz, César & Moreno-Monroy, Ana I., 2012. "Social influence, agent heterogeneity and the emergence of the urban informal sector," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 391(4), pages 1563-1574.
    8. Federico S. Mandelman & Gabriel V. Montes Rojas, 2007. "Microentrepreneurship and the business cycle: is self-employment a desired outcome?," Working Paper 2007-15, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
    9. Mitra, Arup & Murayama, Mayumi, 2008. "Rural to Urban Migration: A District Level Analysis for India," IDE Discussion Papers 137, Institute of Developing Economies, Japan External Trade Organization(JETRO).
    10. Asfaha, T.A. & Jooste, Andre, 2006. "The agricultural input elasticity of rural-urban migration in South Africa," Agrekon, Agricultural Economics Association of South Africa (AEASA), vol. 45(1), March.
    11. Cornilius Chikawama, 2004. "Quota Rural Off-Farm Employment and Farm Investment: An Analytical Framework and Evidence from Zimbabwe," Working Papers E04, Department of Economics, School of Management and Languages, Heriot Watt University.
    12. Ingrid Dallmann & Katrin Millock, 2013. "Climate Variability and Internal Migration: A Test on Indian Inter-State Migration," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) halshs-00825807, HAL.
    13. Mandelman, Federico S. & Montes-Rojas, Gabriel V., 2009. "Is Self-employment and Micro-entrepreneurship a Desired Outcome?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 37(12), pages 1914-1925, December.

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