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Methodological issues in the application of conjoint analysis in health care

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Author Info

  • Mandy Ryan

    (Health Economics Research Unit, University of Aberdeen, UK)

  • Emma McIntosh
  • Phil Shackley

    (Sheffield Health Economics Group, School of Health and Related Research, University of Sheffield, UK)

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    Abstract

    This paper adds to an increasing literature on methodological questions addressed in the application of conjoint analysis (CA) in health care. Three issues are addressed: ordering effects; internal validity; and internal consistency. The results of an application of CA in a primary care setting provide no evidence that the ordering of scenarios was important. Evidence was found of both internal validity and internal consistency. In addition, individual preferences were found to be determined by experiences, which raise potentially important questions regarding the elicitation and use of such preferences in economic evaluation. © 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. in its journal Health Economics.

    Volume (Year): 7 (1998)
    Issue (Month): 4 ()
    Pages: 373-378

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    Handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:7:y:1998:i:4:p:373-378

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    Web page: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5749

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    Cited by:
    1. G. Salkeld & M. Ryan & L. Short, 2000. "The veil of experience: do consumers prefer what they know best?," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 9(3), pages 267-270.
    2. F. Reed Johnson & Melissa Ruby Banzhaf & William H. Desvousges, 2000. "Willingness to pay for improved respiratory and cardiovascular health: a multiple-format, stated-preference approach," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 9(4), pages 295-317.
    3. Stirling Bryan & Paul Dolan, 2004. "Discrete choice experiments in health economics," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer, vol. 5(3), pages 199-202, September.
    4. Shelley Farrar & Mandy Ryan, 1999. "Response-ordering effects: a methodological issue in conjoint analysis," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 8(1), pages 75-79.
    5. Deborah A. Marshall & F. Reed Johnson & Nathalie A. Kulin & Semra Özdemir & Judith M. E. Walsh & John K. Marshall & Stephanie Van Bebber & Kathryn A. Phillips, 2009. "How do physician assessments of patient preferences for colorectal cancer screening tests differ from actual preferences? A comparison in Canada and the United States using a stated-choice survey," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(12), pages 1420-1439.
    6. Harry Telser & Peter Zweifel, 2002. "Measuring willingness-to-pay for risk reduction: an application of conjoint analysis," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 11(2), pages 129-139.
    7. Tara Maddala & Kathryn A. Phillips & F. Reed Johnson, 2003. "An experiment on simplifying conjoint analysis designs for measuring preferences," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 12(12), pages 1035-1047.
    8. Brouwer, Roy & Bateman, Ian J., 2005. "Benefits transfer of willingness to pay estimates and functions for health-risk reductions: a cross-country study," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(3), pages 591-611, May.
    9. Jens Hougaard & Tue Tjur & Lars Østerdal, 2012. "On the meaningfulness of testing preference axioms in stated preference discrete choice experiments," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer, vol. 13(4), pages 409-417, August.
    10. Mandy Ryan & Cristina Ubach, 2003. "Testing for an experience endowment effect in health care," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 10(7), pages 407-410.
    11. del Saz Salazar, Salvador & Hernandez Sancho, Francesc & Sala Garrido, Ramon, 2009. "Estimación del valor económico de la calidad del agua de un río mediante una doble aproximación: una aplicación de los principios económicos de la Directiva Marco del Agua," Economia Agraria y Recursos Naturales, Spanish Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 9(1).
    12. Neuman, Tzahi & Neuman, Einat & Neuman, Shoshana, 2010. "Explorations of the effect of experience on preferences for a health-care service," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 39(3), pages 407-419, June.
    13. Einat Neuman & Shoshona Neuman, 2008. "Reference-dependent preferences and loss aversion: A discrete choice experiment in the health-care sector," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 3, pages 162-173, February.
    14. Neuman, Einat & Neuman, Shoshana, 2007. "Reference-Dependent Preferences and Loss Aversion: A Discrete Choice Experiment in the Health-Care Sector," IZA Discussion Papers 3238, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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