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Parental Educational Investment and Children’s Academic Risk: Estimates of the Impact of Sibship Size and Birth Order from Exogenous Variation in Fertility

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  • Dalton Conley
  • Rebecca Glauber
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    Abstract

    This study uses exogenous variation in sibling sex composition to estimate the causal effect of sibship size on boys’ probabilities of private school attendance and grade retention. Using the 1990 U.S. Census, we find that for second-born boys, increased sibship size reduces the likelihood of private school attendance by six percentage points and increases grade retention by almost one percentage point. Sibship size has no effect for first-born boys. Instrumental variable estimates are largely consistent across racial groups, although the standard errors are larger for nonwhites as they have smaller sample sizes and this renders them insignificant at traditional alpha levels.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by University of Wisconsin Press in its journal Journal of Human Resources.

    Volume (Year): 41 (2006)
    Issue (Month): 4 ()
    Pages:

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    Handle: RePEc:uwp:jhriss:v:41:y:2006:i:4:p722-737

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    Web page: http://jhr.uwpress.org/

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    Cited by:
    1. Parfait Eloundou-Enyegue & Sarah Giroux, 2012. "Fertility Transitions and Schooling: From Micro- to Macro-Level Associations," Demography, Springer, vol. 49(4), pages 1407-1432, November.
    2. Douglas Allen & Catherine Pakaluk & Joseph Price, 2013. "Nontraditional Families and Childhood Progress Through School: A Comment on Rosenfeld," Demography, Springer, vol. 50(3), pages 955-961, June.
    3. Black, Sandra & Devereux, Paul J. & Salvanes, Kjell G, 2007. "Small Family, Smart Family? Family Size and the IQ Scores of Young Men," CEPR Discussion Papers 6443, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    4. Christelle Dumas & Arnaud Lefranc, 2013. ""Sex in marriage is a divine gift": For whom ? Evidence from the Manila contraceptive ban," Working Papers hal-00867874, HAL.
    5. Wei-hsin Yu & Kuo-hsien Su & Chi-Tsun Chiu, 2012. "Sibship Characteristics and Transition to First Marriage in Taiwan: Explaining Gender Asymmetries," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer, vol. 31(4), pages 609-636, August.
    6. Tobias Stoehr, 2013. "Intra-Family Migration Decisions and Elderly Left Behind," Kiel Working Papers 1858, Kiel Institute for the World Economy.
    7. Das Gupta, Monica, 2013. "Population, poverty, and climate change," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6631, The World Bank.
    8. Nunley, John M. & Seals, Alan, 2009. "Child-Custody Reform and Marriage-Specific Investment in Children," MPRA Paper 16313, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Haoming Liu, 2014. "The quality–quantity trade-off: evidence from the relaxation of China’s one-child policy," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 27(2), pages 565-602, April.
    10. Letícia Marteleto & Laetícia Souza, 2012. "The Changing Impact of Family Size on Adolescents’ Schooling: Assessing the Exogenous Variation in Fertility Using Twins in Brazil," Demography, Springer, vol. 49(4), pages 1453-1477, November.
    11. Chakrabarti, Rajashri, 2013. "Do vouchers lead to sorting under random private school selection? Evidence from the Milwaukee voucher program," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 191-218.
    12. V. Joseph Hotz & Juan Pantano, 2013. "Strategic Parenting, Birth Order and School Performance," NBER Working Papers 19542, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    13. Silles, Mary A., 2010. "The implications of family size and birth order for test scores and behavioral development," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(5), pages 795-803, October.
    14. Nunley, John M. & Seals Jr., Richard Alan, 2011. "Child-custody reform, marital investment in children, and the labor supply of married mothers," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 14-24, January.
    15. Dang, Hai-Anh & Rogers, Halsey, 2013. "The decision to invest in child quality over quantity : household size and household investment in education in Vietnam," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6487, The World Bank.
    16. Dalton Conley & Gordon C. McCord & Jeffrey D. Sachs, 2007. "Africa's Lagging Demographic Transition: Evidence from Exogenous Impacts of Malaria Ecology and Agricultural Technology," NBER Working Papers 12892, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    17. Edwin S. Wong, 2013. "Gender preference and transfers from parents to children: an inter-regional comparison," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 27(1), pages 61-80, January.
    18. Emla Fitzsimons & Bansi Malde, 2014. "Empirically probing the quantity–quality model," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 27(1), pages 33-68, January.

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