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Favorable Self-Selection and the Internal Migration of Young White Males in the United States

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  • Paul E. Gabriel
  • Susanne Schmitz
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    Abstract

    This study offers an alternative empirical technique to test whether the favorable self-selection hypothesis applies to internal migrants in the United States. Our empirical specification attempts to determine if prospective migrants possess unobserved traits such as higher ability or motivation which influence their earnings potential relative to nonmigrants. Using NLSY data for 1985 through 1991, we find some support for the favorable self-selection hypothesis for white males who move from one SMSA to another. Prior to their move, prospective migrants enjoy a consistent advantage in annual wage and salary income relative to nonmigrants with similar earnings-related characteristics.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by University of Wisconsin Press in its journal Journal of Human Resources.

    Volume (Year): 30 (1995)
    Issue (Month): 3 ()
    Pages: 460-471

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    Handle: RePEc:uwp:jhriss:v:30:y:1995:i:3:p:460-471

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    Web page: http://jhr.uwpress.org/

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    Cited by:
    1. Consuelo Abellán-Colodrón, 1998. "Ganancia salarial esperada como determinante de la decisión individual de emigrar," Investigaciones Economicas, Fundación SEPI, Fundación SEPI, vol. 22(1), pages 93-117, January.
    2. John C. Ham & Xianghong Li & Patricia B. Reagan, 2005. "Propensity score matching, a distance-based measure of migration, and the wage growth of young men," Staff Reports, Federal Reserve Bank of New York 212, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
    3. Philippe Lemistre & Marie-Benoît Magrini, 2008. "La mobilité géographique des jeunes ouvriers et employés est-elle rentable ?," Économie et Prévision, Programme National Persée, Programme National Persée, vol. 185(4), pages 63-88.
    4. Boman, Anders, 2012. "Employment effects of extended geographic scope in job search," Labour Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 19(5), pages 643-652.
    5. Hotchkiss, Julie L. & Pitts, M. Melinda & Robertson, John C., 2008. "The Push-Pull Effects of the Information Technology Boom and Bust," MPRA Paper 44800, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Ham, John C. & Li, Xianghong & Reagan, Patricia B., 2011. "Matching and semi-parametric IV estimation, a distance-based measure of migration, and the wages of young men," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 161(2), pages 208-227, April.
    7. Chiswick, Barry R., 2000. "Are Immigrants Favorably Self-Selected? An Economic Analysis," IZA Discussion Papers 131, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    8. Thomas Liebig & Alfonso Sousa-Poza, 2003. "How does income inequality influence international migration?," ERSA conference papers ersa03p472, European Regional Science Association.
    9. Bohyun Jang & John Casterline & Anastasia Snyder, 2014. "Migration and marriage: Modeling the joint process," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 30(47), pages 1339-1366, April.
    10. Halliday, Timothy J. & Kimmitt, Michael C., 2008. "Selective Migration and Health," IZA Discussion Papers 3458, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    11. John C. Ham & Xianghong Li & Patricia B. Reagan, 2004. "Propensity Score Matching, a Distance-Based Measure of Migration, and the Wage Growth of Young Men," Working Papers, York University, Department of Economics 2004_3, York University, Department of Economics.
    12. Anders Boman, 2011. "Does migration pay? Earnings effects of geographic mobility following job displacement," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, Springer, vol. 24(4), pages 1369-1384, October.

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