Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

An Exchange: The Theory of Human Capital and the Earnings of Women: Women's Earnings Reexamined

Contents:

Author Info

  • Jacob Mincer
  • Solomon Polachek

Abstract

This study relies on Brazilian census data from 1960-2000 to analyze long-term trends in racial and gender wage disparities in the urban labor market of São Paulo, one of Latin America's most dynamic economies. Afro-Brazilians and women have made ...

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/pdfplus/145305
Download Restriction: A subscripton is required to access pdf files. Pay per article is available.

As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

Bibliographic Info

Article provided by University of Wisconsin Press in its journal Journal of Human Resources.

Volume (Year): 13 (1978)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 118-134

as in new window
Handle: RePEc:uwp:jhriss:v:13:y:1978:i:1:p:118-134

Contact details of provider:
Web page: http://jhr.uwpress.org/

Related research

Keywords:

References

No references listed on IDEAS
You can help add them by filling out this form.

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Self, Sharmistha, 2005. "What makes motherhood so expensive?: The role of social expectations, interdependence, and coordination failure in explaining lower wages of mothers," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 34(6), pages 850-865, December.
  2. Dennis Görlich & Andries de Grip, 2007. "Human Capital Depreciation During Family-related Career Interruptions in Male and Female Occupations," Kiel Working Papers 1379, Kiel Institute for the World Economy.
  3. Goldin, Claudia, 1984. "The historical evolution of female earnings functions and occupations," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 21(1), pages 1-27, January.
  4. Troske, Kenneth & Voicu, Alexandru, 2004. "Joint Estimation of Sequential Labor Force Participation and Fertility Decisions Using Markov Chain Monte Carlo Techniques," IZA Discussion Papers 1251, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  5. Alan L. Gustman & Thomas L. Steinmeier, 1986. "Wages, Employment, Training and Job Attachment in Low Wage Labor Marketsfor Women," NBER Working Papers 2037, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Charles Brown & Mary Corcoran, 1996. "Sex-Based Differences in School Content and the Male/Female Wage Gap," NBER Working Papers 5580, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:uwp:jhriss:v:13:y:1978:i:1:p:118-134. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: ().

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.