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Marriage Choices of Movie Stars: Does Spouse’s Education Matter?

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  • Gustaf Bruze

Abstract

Marital sorting on education is an important but poorly understood source of inequality. This paper analyzes a group of men and women who do not meet their spouses in school, are not sorted by education in the workplace, and whose earnings are not correlated with their years of education. Nevertheless, movie actors marry spouses with an education similar to their own. These findings suggest that male and female preferences alone induce considerable sorting on education in marriage and that men and women have very strong preferences for nonfinancial partner traits correlated with years of education.

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File URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/pdfplus/10.1086/660108
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File URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/full/10.1086/660108
Download Restriction: Access to the online full text or PDF requires a subscription.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by University of Chicago Press in its journal Journal of Human Capital.

Volume (Year): 5 (2011)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 1 - 28

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Handle: RePEc:ucp:jhucap:doi:10.1086/660108

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Web page: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/JHC/

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Cited by:
  1. Alena Bicakova & Stepan Jurajda, 2014. "The Quiet Revolution and the Family: Gender Composition of Tertiary Education and Early Fertility Patterns," CERGE-EI Working Papers wp504, The Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education - Economic Institute, Prague.
  2. Alfred Galichon & Arnaud Dupuy, 2012. "Personality traits and the marriage market," Sciences Po publications 6943, Sciences Po.
  3. Piracha, Matloob & Randazzo, Teresa & Vadean, Florin, 2013. "Remittances and Occupational Outcomes of the Household Members Left-Behind," IZA Discussion Papers 7582, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  4. Marco Francesconi & Mich�le Belot, 2011. "Dating Preferences and Meeting Opportunities in Mate Choice Decisions," Economics Discussion Papers 702, University of Essex, Department of Economics.

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