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Black-White Earnings over the 1970s and 1980s: Gender Differences in Trends

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  • Blau, Francine D
  • Beller, Andrea H

Abstract

Using CPS data to analyze black-white earnings trends, the authors find that black women fared better than men in some respects but in other important respects their experience was similar. On the one hand, over the period as a whole, black women experienced increases in both annual earnings and estimated.wages compared to white women, while black men gained only in terms of wages compared to white men. Black women also made faster progress relative to white males than did black males. On the other hand, both groups experienced stagnating or declining earnings and wages relative to whites of the same sex during the 1980s, with younger blacks faring particularly poorly. Copyright 1992 by MIT Press.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by MIT Press in its journal Review of Economics & Statistics.

Volume (Year): 74 (1992)
Issue (Month): 2 (May)
Pages: 276-86

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Handle: RePEc:tpr:restat:v:74:y:1992:i:2:p:276-86

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Web page: http://mitpress.mit.edu/journals/

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  1. William Darity, 1980. "Illusions of black economic progress," The Review of Black Political Economy, Springer, vol. 10(2), pages 153-168, December.
  2. Richard Butler & James J. Heckman, 1977. "The Government's Impact on the Labor Market Status of Black Americans: A Critical Review," NBER Working Papers 0183, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Lillard, Lee & Smith, James P & Welch, Finis, 1986. "What Do We Really Know about Wages? The Importance of Nonreporting and Census Imputation," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 94(3), pages 489-506, June.
  4. James P. Smith, 2004. "The Convergence to Racial Equality in Women's Wages," Labor and Demography 0402011, EconWPA.
  5. Alan S. Blinder, 1973. "Wage Discrimination: Reduced Form and Structural Estimates," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 8(4), pages 436-455.
  6. O'Neill, June, 1990. "The Role of Human Capital in Earnings Differences between Black and White Men," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 4(4), pages 25-45, Fall.
  7. Charles F. Manski, 1989. "Anatomy of the Selection Problem," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 24(3), pages 343-360.
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Cited by:
  1. Roland G. Fryer , Jr. & Devah Pager & J�rg L. Spenkuch, 2013. "Racial Disparities in Job Finding and Offered Wages," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 56(3), pages 633 - 689.
  2. Claudia Olivetti & Barbara Petrongolo & Pietro Garibaldi & Christopher Pissarides & Etienne Wasmer, 2005. "Women in the Labour Force : How Well is Europe Doing ?," Sciences Po publications info:hdl:2441/9081, Sciences Po.
  3. Hurst, Michael, 1997. "The determinants of earnings differentials for indigenous Americans: Human capital, location, or discrimination?," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(4), pages 787-807.
  4. Hamermesh, Daniel S & Biddle, Jeff E, 1994. "Beauty and the Labor Market," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(5), pages 1174-94, December.
  5. David Card & Thomas Lemieux, 1994. "Changing Wage Structure and Black-White Differentials Among Men and Women: A Longitudinal Analysis," NBER Working Papers 4755, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. repec:spo:wpecon:info:hdl:2441/9081 is not listed on IDEAS

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