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Perceptions of Subjective Economic Well-Being and Support for Market Reform among China's Urban Population

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Author Info

  • Ingrid Nielsen
  • Chris Nyland
  • Russell Smyth
  • Cherrie Jiuhua Zhu

Abstract

This article examines whether subjective economic assessments have any impact on support for further market reforms among China's urban population, utilising a large survey of 10,716 people across 32 cities. The effect of subjective economic well-being on support for market reforms is an important issue for the Chinese government as it seeks to sell the benefits of increased globalisation and marketisation to its citizens. Our main finding is that people's assessment of the overall economic situation helps to explain support for market reform, although the relationship is weak, while people's assessment of their own economic circumstances does not influence support for reform. The findings are compared with those of similar studies for Central and Eastern Europe.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Post-Communist Economies.

Volume (Year): 17 (2005)
Issue (Month): 4 ()
Pages: 425-447

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Handle: RePEc:taf:pocoec:v:17:y:2005:i:4:p:425-447

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  1. Davidson, Russell & MacKinnon, James G., 1989. "Testing for Consistency using Artificial Regressions," Econometric Theory, Cambridge University Press, vol. 5(03), pages 363-384, December.
  2. John S. Earle & Scott G. Gehlbach, . "A Spoonful of Sugar: Privatization and Popular Support for Reform in the Czech Republic," Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles jse20033, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
  3. Russell Davidson & James G. MacKinnon, 2001. "Artificial Regressions," Working Papers 1038, Queen's University, Department of Economics.
  4. Appleton, Simon & Knight, John & Song, Lina & Xia, Qingjie, 2002. "Labor retrenchment in China: Determinants and consequences," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 13(2-3), pages 252-275.
  5. King, Gary & Zeng, Langche, 2001. "Explaining Rare Events in International Relations," International Organization, Cambridge University Press, vol. 55(03), pages 693-715, June.
  6. Branko Milanovic, 2003. "The Two Faces Of Globalization: Against Globalization As We Know It," Development and Comp Systems 0303007, EconWPA.
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