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Additional Evidence on the Relationship between Class Size and Student Performance

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Author Info

  • J J Arias
  • Douglas M. Walker

Abstract

Much of the economic education literature suggests that the principles of economics class size does not significantly affect student performance. However, study methods have varied in terms of the aggregation level (student or class), the measure of performance (TUCE or course letter grade), and the class size measure (e.g., students who completed both the TUCE pretest and posttest). The authors perform an experiment with principles students using total exam points as the dependent variable in a model to explain student performance. By using the same instructor for all sections, the authors control variation in instruction, lecture material, and topic coverage; they also account for variation in student abilities. In contrast to many other studies, the authors find statistically significant evidence that small class size has a positive impact on student performance.

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.3200/JECE.35.4.311-329
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal The Journal of Economic Education.

Volume (Year): 35 (2004)
Issue (Month): 4 (October)
Pages: 311-329

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Handle: RePEc:taf:jeduce:v:35:y:2004:i:4:p:311-329

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Cited by:
  1. Muriel Meunier, 2006. "Fonctions de production éducationnelle: le cas de la Suisse," Swiss Journal of Economics and Statistics (SJES), Swiss Society of Economics and Statistics (SSES), vol. 142(IV), pages 579–615, December.
  2. Fu, Shihe & Viard, Brian, 2014. "Commute Costs and Labor Supply: Evidence from a Satellite Campus," MPRA Paper 53740, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  3. Carlos J. Asarta & Roger B. Butters & Andrew Perumal, 2013. "Success in Economics Major: Is it Path Dependent?," Working Papers 13-11, University of Delaware, Department of Economics.
  4. Barb Bloemhof & John Livernois, 2011. "Making Large Classes Small(er): Assessing the Effectiveness Of a Hybrid Teaching Technology," Working Papers 1111, University of Guelph, Department of Economics and Finance.
  5. Zhang, Lemin & Marsh, Dan, 2006. "How Can We Predict Performance in Tertiary Level Economics?," 2006 Conference, August 24-25, 2006, Nelson, New Zealand 31974, New Zealand Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
  6. Kim Sosin & Betty J. Lecha & Rajshree Agarwal & Robin L. Bartlett & Joseph I. Daniel, 2004. "Efficiency in the Use of Technology in Economic Education: Some Preliminary Results," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(2), pages 253-258, May.
  7. Butters, Roger & Asarta, Carlos & Thompson, Eric C., 2013. "The Production of Economic Knowledge in Urban and Rural Areas: The Role of Student, Teacher, and School Characteristics," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 45(01), February.
  8. Mandel, Philipp & Süssmuth, Bernd, 2011. "Size matters. The relevance and Hicksian surplus of preferred college class size," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(5), pages 1073-1084, October.
  9. Adel Ben Youssef & Mounir Dahmani, 2008. "The Impact of ICT on Student Performance in Higher Education: Direct Effects, Indirect Effects and Organisational Change," Post-Print halshs-00936560, HAL.
  10. Rupert G. Rhodd & Sandra M. Schrouder & Marcus T. Allen, 2009. "Does the Performance on Principles of Economics Courses Affect the Overall Academic Success of Undergraduate Business Majors?," International Review of Economic Education, Economics Network, University of Bristol, vol. 8(1), pages 48-63.
  11. Wisdom Akpalu & Richard Vogel & Xu Zhang, 2012. "The Rate Of Time Preference, Seat Location Choice And Student Performance In The Classroom," New York Economic Review, New York State Economics Association (NYSEA), vol. 43(1), pages 33-45.
  12. Juan Luis Jiménez & Jordi Perdiguero & Ancor Suárez, 2011. "Debating as a classroom tool for adapting learning outcomes to the European higher education area," IREA Working Papers 201109, University of Barcelona, Research Institute of Applied Economics, revised Jun 2011.

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