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Expected Proficiencies for Undergraduate Economics Majors

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  • W. Lee Hansen
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    Abstract

    The case for adopting a proficiencies approach to instruction and learning in the economics major is reiterated. This approach focuses on what graduating majors should be able to do with the knowledge and skills they acquire in the major, that is, their ability to demonstrate their learning in practical ways. The author's list of five proficiencies, advanced in the mid-1980s, is reviewed and revised; one additional proficiency is added and several others are refined. The author discusses the emphasis given to these proficiencies with top economics undergraduates at two major research universities, the author's experience with incorporating these proficiencies into his instruction, and the challenge of assessing the ability of economics majors to demonstrate these proficiencies.

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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1080/00220480109596105
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal The Journal of Economic Education.

    Volume (Year): 32 (2001)
    Issue (Month): 3 (January)
    Pages: 231-242

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    Handle: RePEc:taf:jeduce:v:32:y:2001:i:3:p:231-242

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    Cited by:
    1. Costas Siriopoulos & Gerasimos Pomonis, 2009. "Selecting Strategies to Foster Economists' Critical Thinking Skills: A Quantile Regression Approach," International Review of Economic Education, Economics Network, University of Bristol, vol. 8(1), pages 106-131.
    2. W. Lee Hansen & Michael K. Salemi & John J. Siegfried, 2002. "Use It or Lose It: Teaching Literacy in the Economics Principles Course," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(2), pages 463-472, May.
    3. Chang Da Wan & Roland K. Cheo, 2012. "Determinants of Malaysian and Singaporean Economics Undergraduates' Academic Performance," International Review of Economic Education, Economics Network, University of Bristol, vol. 11(2), pages 7-27.
    4. Elsa Galarza Contreras & Marianne Johnson, 2007. "Internationalising Intermediate Microeconomics: Collaborative Case Studies and Web-Based Learning," International Review of Economic Education, Economics Network, University of Bristol, vol. 6(1), pages 9-26.
    5. Carlos J. Asarta & Roger B. Butters & Andrew Perumal, 2013. "Success in Economics Major: Is it Path Dependent?," Working Papers 13-11, University of Delaware, Department of Economics.
    6. Prathibha V. Joshi, 2013. "Understanding Cost and Production Using a Cooperative Learning Technique in a Microeconomics Class," Journal for Economic Educators, Middle Tennessee State University, Business and Economic Research Center, vol. 13(1), pages 14-22, Fall.
    7. Dennis S. Edwards, . "An Economics Capstone Course from Creation to Presentation," Journal for Economic Educators, Middle Tennessee State University, Business and Economic Research Center.
    8. Alexei G. Orlov & John Roufagalas, 2012. "Performance Determinants in Undergraduate Economics Classes: The Effect of Cognitive Reflection," International Review of Economic Education, Economics Network, University of Bristol, vol. 11(2), pages 28-45.

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