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Teaching Methods in U.S. Undergraduate Economics Courses

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Author Info

  • William E. Becker
  • Michael Watts

Abstract

In 1995 and 2000, the authors surveyed academic economists in the United States to establish how economics is taught in four types of undergraduate courses. The authors report overall findings from the 2000 survey and compare these results with the aggregate findings for respondents from all types of colleges and universities in the 1995 survey. The basic finding is that, despite some indications of increased emphasis and interest in teaching over this period, the teaching methods in these courses have changed very little over the past five years and are still dominated by “chalk and talk” classroom presentations.

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1080/00220480109596108
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal The Journal of Economic Education.

Volume (Year): 32 (2001)
Issue (Month): 3 (January)
Pages: 269-279

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Handle: RePEc:taf:jeduce:v:32:y:2001:i:3:p:269-279

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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Lourdes Espinoza & Carlos Gustavo Machicado & Katia Makhlouf, 2007. "La Enseñanza de Economía en Bolivia y Chile," Development Research Working Paper Series 10/2007, Institute for Advanced Development Studies.
  2. Martin P. Shanahan & Gigi Foster & Jan H. F. Meyer, 2006. "Operationalising a Threshold Concept in Economics: A Pilot Study Using Multiple Choice Questions on Opportunity Cost," International Review of Economic Education, Economics Network, University of Bristol, vol. 5(2), pages 29-57.
  3. Nilss Olekalns, 2002. "The Teaching of First Year Economics in Australian Universities," Department of Economics - Working Papers Series 848, The University of Melbourne.
  4. Cynthia L. Harter & William E. Becker & Michael Watts, 2011. "Time Allocations and Reward Structures for US Academic Economists from 1955–2005: Evidence from Three National Surveys," International Review of Economic Education, Economics Network, University of Bristol, vol. 10(2), pages 6-27.
  5. Robin Bartlett & Marianne Ferber & Carole Green, 2009. "The Committee on Economic Education: Its Effect on the Introductory Course and Women in Economics," Forum for Social Economics, Springer, vol. 38(2), pages 153-172, July.
  6. Arlene Garces-Ozanne & Phyll Esplin, 2008. "To work or not to work ... that is the question: A classroom experiment on how the labour market operates," Working Papers 0802, University of Otago, Department of Economics, revised Jan 2008.
  7. Ann L Owen, 2007. "Integrating Computer Applications Into Economics Electives," International Review of Economic Education, Economics Network, University of Bristol, vol. 6(1), pages 77-92.
  8. Nicholas Flores & Scott J. Savage, 2007. "Student Demand for Streaming Lecture Video: Emprical Evidence from Undergraduate Economics Classes," International Review of Economic Education, Economics Network, University of Bristol, vol. 6(2), pages 57-78.
  9. Paul Dalziel, 2011. "Schumpeter's 'Vision' and the Teaching of Principles of Economics to Resource Students," International Review of Economic Education, Economics Network, University of Bristol, vol. 10(2), pages 63-74.
  10. Carlos Gustavo Machado & Lourdes Espinoza & Katia Makhlouf, 2009. "La enseñanza de economía en Bolivia y Chile," Research Department Publications 4632, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
  11. Jill Caviglia-Harris & Brian Hill, 2010. "Assessment Plan and Design: A Model for Enhancing Instruction in Economics Courses," International Review of Economic Education, Economics Network, University of Bristol, vol. 9(1), pages 10-30.
  12. Cheah, L.L. & Stokes, A.R. & Wilson, E.J., 1999. "WinEcon Fiscal Pathways: A Computer Based Learning Module for the Subject Macroeconomic Theory and Policy," Economics Working Papers WP99-14, School of Economics, University of Wollongong, NSW, Australia.
  13. Daniel Lass & Bernard Morzuch & Richard Rogers, 2007. "Teaching with Technology to Engage Students and Enhance Learning," Working Papers 2007-1, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Department of Resource Economics.
  14. Dean Garratt & Rebecca Taylor, 2004. "Issue-based teaching in economics," Working Papers 2004/2, Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham Business School, Economics Division.
  15. Alejandro Mungaray & Martn Ramrez-Urquidy & Michelle Texis & David Ledezma & Natanael Ramrez, 2008. "Learning Economics by Servicing: a Mexican Experience of Service-Learning in Microenterprises," International Review of Economic Education, Economics Network, University of Bristol, vol. 7(2), pages 9-38.

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