Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

A Durable Replacement Model for Symbolic versus Utilitarian Consumption: An Integrated Cultural and Socio-economic Perspective

Contents:

Author Info

  • Shijin Yoo
  • Seh-Woong Chung
  • Jin Han
Registered author(s):

    Abstract

    The accumulated knowledge on durable consumption has traditionally been premised upon identifying personal factors (e.g. demographics or psychographics) underlying the purchase decision. On a broader scope, however, consumer behavior is shaped by cultural and social factors, and our understanding would be incomplete without these considerations. To this end, this study sets out to provide an integrative framework on durable consumption. Specifically, the proposed framework explores whether cultural differences do exist in the perception of a selected durable (e.g. automobile) on the symbolic/utilitarian dimension, which in turn, may affect the length of the replacement cycle, likelihood of upgrading to a higher status model, as well as, inertia towards remaining within the same product-type in the category (e.g. sedan, SUV, minivan, pickup truck). Applying a multinomial logit model to Korean and US automobile transaction data, the finding reveal that Korean consumers tend to have shorter replacement cycles, engage in more upgrades but are less likely to change the product-type than American consumers. Considerations of cultural and socio-economic factors as key drivers of the differences in perception and behavior are put forward. Managerial implications and directions for future research are also discussed.

    Download Info

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
    File URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/12265080600715426
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Global Economic Review.

    Volume (Year): 35 (2006)
    Issue (Month): 2 ()
    Pages: 193-206

    as in new window
    Handle: RePEc:taf:glecrv:v:35:y:2006:i:2:p:193-206

    Contact details of provider:
    Web page: http://www.tandfonline.com/RGER20

    Order Information:
    Web: http://www.tandfonline.com/pricing/journal/RGER20

    Related research

    Keywords: Durable consumption; multinominal logit model; symbolic meaning;

    References

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
    as in new window
    1. Aaker, Jennifer L & Maheswaran, Durairaj, 1997. " The Effect of Cultural Orientation on Persuasion," Journal of Consumer Research, University of Chicago Press, vol. 24(3), pages 315-28, December.
    2. Briley, Donnel A & Morris, Michael W & Simonson, Itamar, 2000. " Reasons as Carriers of Culture: Dynamic versus Dispositional Models of Cultural Influence on Decision Making," Journal of Consumer Research, University of Chicago Press, vol. 27(2), pages 157-78, September.
    3. Sirgy, M Joseph, 1982. " Self-Concept in Consumer Behavior: A Critical Review," Journal of Consumer Research, University of Chicago Press, vol. 9(3), pages 287-300, December.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Lists

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:taf:glecrv:v:35:y:2006:i:2:p:193-206. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Michael McNulty).

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.