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The Other Economy: A Suggestion for a Distinctively Feminist Economics

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  • Susan Donath
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    Abstract

    This paper briefly introduces the idea of the "other" economy. The other economy is concerned with the direct production and maintenance of human beings as an end in itself. An important characteristic of work in the other economy is that few productivity gains are possible. It is argued that the study of the other economy and its relationship to the market economy could form the basis of a distinctively feminist economics.

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    File URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/135457000337723
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Feminist Economics.

    Volume (Year): 6 (2000)
    Issue (Month): 1 ()
    Pages: 115-123

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    Handle: RePEc:taf:femeco:v:6:y:2000:i:1:p:115-123

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    Web page: http://www.tandfonline.com/RFEC20

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    Related research

    Keywords: Feminist Economics; Caring Work; Child Care; Productivity;

    References

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    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
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    1. Myra Strober & Suzanne Gerlach-Downie & Kenneth Yeager, 1995. "Child care centers as workplaces," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 1(1), pages 93-119.
    2. Baumol, William J, 1972. "Macroeconomics of Unbalanced Growth: Reply," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 62(1), pages 150, March.
    3. Nancy Folbre, 1995. ""Holding hands at midnight": The paradox of caring labor," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 1(1), pages 73-92.
    4. Susan Himmelweit, 1995. "The discovery of “unpaid work”: the social consequences of the expansion of “work”," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 1(2), pages 1-19.
    5. Jochimsen, Maren & Knobloch, Ulrike, 1997. "Making the hidden visible: the importance of caring activities and their principles for any economy," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 20(2), pages 107-112, February.
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    Cited by:
    1. Antigone Lyberaki, 2008. "“Deae ex Machina”: migrant women, care work and women’s employment in Greece," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 23183, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    2. Laura Camfield, 2014. "Growing Up in Ethiopia and Andhra Pradesh: The Impact of Social Protection Schemes on Girls’ Roles and Responsibilities," The European Journal of Development Research, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 26(1), pages 107-123, January.
    3. Margaret Villanueva, 2002. "Racialization and the US Latina Experience: Economic Implications," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 8(2), pages 145-161.
    4. Susan Himmelweit, 2002. "Making Visible the Hidden Economy: The Case for Gender-Impact Analysis of Economic Policy," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 8(1), pages 49-70.

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