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Who Benefits from Public Education in Greece? Evidence and Policy Implications

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  • Manos Antoninis
  • Panos Tsakloglou

Abstract

This paper examines the distributional impact of public education in Greece using the micro-data of the 1993/94 Household Budget Survey. The aggregate distributional impact of public education is found to be progressive although the incidence varies according to the level of education under examination. In-kind transfers of education services in the fields of primary and secondary education lead to a considerable decline in inequality, whereas the distributional impact of tertiary education transfers is found to be regressive. The overall progressivity of public education transfers declined between 1988 and 1994, and almost the entire decline is driven by changes in the progressivity of tertiary education transfers. The main policy implications of the findings are outlined in the concluding section.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Education Economics.

Volume (Year): 9 (2001)
Issue (Month): 2 ()
Pages: 197-222

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Handle: RePEc:taf:edecon:v:9:y:2001:i:2:p:197-222

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References

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  1. Patrinos, Harry Anthony, 1995. "Socioeconomic background, schooling, experience, ability and monetary rewards in Greece," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 14(1), pages 85-91, March.
  2. Tsakloglou, Panos & Antoninis, Manos, 1999. "On the distributional impact of public education: evidence from Greece," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 18(4), pages 439-452, October.
  3. Raquel Fernandez & Richard Rogerson, 1994. "On the political economy of education subsidies," Staff Report 185, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
  4. Bruno, Michael & Ravallion, Martin & Squire, Lyn, 1996. "Equity and growth in developing countries : old and new perspectives on the policy issues," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1563, The World Bank.
  5. Jimenez, Emmanuel, 1986. "The Public Subsidization of Education and Health in Developing Countries: A Review of Equity and Efficiency," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 1(1), pages 111-29, January.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Christos Koutsampelas & Panos Tsakloglou, 2011. "Short-run distributional effects of public education in Greece," University of Cyprus Working Papers in Economics 12-2011, University of Cyprus Department of Economics.
  2. Tim Callan & Tim Smeeding & Panos Tsakloglou, 2008. "Short-run distributional effects of public education transfers to tertiary education students in seven European countries," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(3), pages 275-288.
  3. Rolf Aaberge & Manudeep Bhuller & Audun Langørgen & Magne Mogstad, 2010. "The distributional impact of public services when needs differ," Discussion Papers 621, Research Department of Statistics Norway.
  4. Paulus, Alari & Sutherland, Holly & Tsakloglou, Panos, 2009. "The Distributional Impact of In Kind Public Benefits in European Countries," IZA Discussion Papers 4581, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  5. Caner, Asena & Okten, Cagla, 2013. "Higher education in Turkey: Subsidizing the rich or the poor?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 75-92.
  6. Sakellariou, Chris & Patrinos, Harry Anthony, 2004. "Incidence analysis of public support to the private education sector in Cote d'Ivoire," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3231, The World Bank.
  7. Panos Tsakloglou & Christos Koutsampelas, 2012. "The distribution of full income in Greece," DEOS Working Papers 1207, Athens University of Economics and Business.
  8. Verbist, G. (Gerlinde) & Matsaganis, M. (Manos), 2012. "GINI DP 53: The Redistributive Capacity of Services in the EU," GINI Discussion Papers 53, AIAS, Amsterdam Institute for Advanced Labour Studies.
  9. Elias Katsikas & Theodore Panagiotidis, 2010. "Student Status and Academic Performance: an approach of the quality determinants of university studies in Greece," GreeSE – Hellenic Observatory Papers on Greece and Southeast Europe 40, Hellenic Observatory, LSE.
  10. Callan, Tim & Keane, Claire, 2009. "Non-cash Benefits and the Distribution of Economic Welfare," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 40(1), pages 49-71.
  11. De Pablos Escobar, Laura & Gil Izquierdo, María, 2011. "Impacto distributivo del gasto público en educación universitaria en España: un análisis de incidencia normativa para el nuevo milenio/Distributive Impact of Public Expenditure in Higher Education," Estudios de Economía Aplicada, Estudios de Economía Aplicada, vol. 29, pages 389 (34 pá, Abril.
  12. Tim Callan & Tim Smeeding & Panos Tsakloglou, 2007. "Distributional Effects of Public Education Transfers in Seven European Countries," Papers WP207, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).

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