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Much ado about nothing? Smoking bans and Germany's hospitality industry

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  • Michael Kvasnicka
  • Harald Tauchmann

Abstract

Over the past years, public smoking bans have been introduced in most European countries. Unlike elsewhere, in Germany such bans were introduced at state level at different points in time, which provides important intra-country regional variation that can be exploited to identify the effects of such bans on the hospitality industry. Using monthly data from a compulsory survey carried out by the German Federal Statistical Office, we study the short-run effects that these bans had on establishments’ sales. In contrast to the largely US-based literature, we find that smoke-free policies had a negative (yet moderate) effect on establishment sales. Closure rates of businesses in the hospitality industry, however, were not significantly affected by the introduction of state smoking bans.

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1080/00036846.2011.591739
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Applied Economics.

Volume (Year): 44 (2012)
Issue (Month): 35 (December)
Pages: 4539-4551

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Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:44:y:2012:i:35:p:4539-4551

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References

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  1. David W. Cowling & Philip Bond, 2005. "Smoke-free laws and bar revenues in California - the last call," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 14(12), pages 1273-1281.
  2. Jérôme Adda & Francesca Cornaglia, 2006. "The Effect of Taxes and Bans on Passive Smoking," CEPR Discussion Papers 509, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
  3. Rajeev K. Goel & Michael A. Nelson, 2006. "The Effectiveness of Anti-Smoking Legislation: A Review," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 20(3), pages 325-355, 07.
  4. Gabriel Ahlfeldt & Wolfgang Maennig, 2009. "Impact of Non-Smoking Ordinances on Hospitality Revenues: The Case of Germany," Working Papers 026, Chair for Economic Policy, University of Hamburg.
  5. Robert K. Fleck & F. Andrew Hanssen, 2008. "Why Understanding Smoking Bans Is Important For Estimating Their Effects: California'S Restaurant Smoking Bans And Restaurant Sales," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 46(1), pages 60-76, 01.
  6. Adams Scott & Cotti Chad D., 2007. "The Effect of Smoking Bans on Bars and Restaurants: An Analysis of Changes in Employment," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 7(1), pages 1-34, February.
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Cited by:
  1. Gabriel Ahlfeldt & Wolfgang Maennig, 2009. "Impact of Non-Smoking Ordinances on Hospitality Revenues: The Case of Germany," Working Papers 026, Chair for Economic Policy, University of Hamburg.
  2. Daniel Kuehnle & Christoph Wunder, 2013. "The effects of smoking bans on self-assessed health: evidence from Germany," Working Papers 140, Bavarian Graduate Program in Economics (BGPE).
  3. Harald Tauchmann & Silja Lenz & Till Requate & Christoph Schmidt, 2013. "Tobacco and alcohol: complements or substitutes?," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 45(1), pages 539-566, August.
  4. Jaume Garcia Villar & Ángel López-Nicolás, 2014. "Who is afraid of the big bad ban? An evaluation of the effects of the Spanish clean air law on expenditure at hospitality venues," Economics Working Papers 1413, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
  5. Michael Kvasnicka, 2010. "Public Smoking Bans, Youth Access Laws, and Cigarette Sales at Vending Machines," Ruhr Economic Papers 0173, Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universität Dortmund, Universität Duisburg-Essen.

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