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Marital Fertility Decline in the Netherlands: Child Mortality, Real Wages, and Unemployment, 1860–1939

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  • Jona Schellekens

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  • Frans Poppel
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s13524-012-0112-1
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Springer in its journal Demography.

    Volume (Year): 49 (2012)
    Issue (Month): 3 (August)
    Pages: 965-988

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    Handle: RePEc:spr:demogr:v:49:y:2012:i:3:p:965-988

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    Web page: http://www.springer.com/economics/journal/13524

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    Related research

    Keywords: Marital fertility; Child mortality; Real wages; Unemployment; The Netherlands;

    References

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    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
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    1. Diane Macunovich, 1999. "Relative Cohort Size: Source of a Unifying Theory of Global Fertility Transition," Center for Policy Research Working Papers 8, Center for Policy Research, Maxwell School, Syracuse University.
    2. Matthias Doepke, 2005. "Child mortality and fertility decline: Does the Barro-Becker model fit the facts?," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 18(2), pages 337-366, 06.
    3. Galor, Oded & Weil, David, 1995. "The Gender Gap, Fertility and Growth," CEPR Discussion Papers 1157, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    4. Eckstein, Zvi & Mira, Pedro Solbes & Wolpin, Kenneth, 1998. "A Quantative Analysis of Swedish Fertility Dynamics: 1751-1990," CEPR Discussion Papers 1832, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    5. Claudia Goldin, 1990. "Understanding the Gender Gap: An Economic History of American Women," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number gold90-1, May.
    6. Gary S. Becker & Kevin M. Murphy & Robert Tamura, 1994. "Human Capital, Fertility, and Economic Growth," NBER Chapters, in: Human Capital: A Theoretical and Empirical Analysis with Special Reference to Education (3rd Edition), pages 323-350 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Friedlander, Dov & Schellekens, Jona & Ben-Moshe, Eliahu, 1991. "The Transition from High to Low Marital Fertility: Cultural or Socioeconomic Determinants?," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 39(2), pages 331-51, January.
    8. John C. Brown & Timothy W. Guinnane, 2007. "Regions and time in the European fertility transition: problems in the Princeton Project's statistical methodology -super-1," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 60(3), pages 574-595, 08.
    9. Adrian Raftery & Steven Lewis & Akbar Aghajanian, 1995. "Demand or Ideation? Evidence from the Iranian Marital Fertility Decline," Demography, Springer, vol. 32(2), pages 159-182, May.
    10. Joseph Potter & Carl Schmertmann & Suzana Cavenaghi, 2002. "Fertility and development: evidence from Brazil," Demography, Springer, vol. 39(4), pages 739-761, November.
    11. Gregory Clark, 2005. "Human Capital, Fertility, and the Industrial Revolution," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 3(2-3), pages 505-515, 04/05.
    12. David Sven Reher & Alberto Sanz-Gimeno, 2007. "Rethinking Historical Reproductive Change: Insights from Longitudinal Data for a Spanish Town," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 33(4), pages 703-727.
    13. Theodore W. Schultz, 1974. "Economics of the Family: Marriage, Children, and Human Capital," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number schu74-1, May.
    14. Eckstein, Z. & Mira, P. & Wolpin, K.I., 1997. "A Quantitative Analysis of Swidish Fertility Dynamics : 1751-1990," Papers 22-97, Tel Aviv.
    15. Theodore W. Schultz, 1974. "References and Index to "Economics of the Family: Marriage, Children, and Human Capital"," NBER Chapters, in: Economics of the Family: Marriage, Children, and Human Capital, pages 549-584 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    16. Alberto Palloni & Hantamala Rafalimanana, 1999. "The effects of infant mortality on fertility revisited: new evidence from latin america," Demography, Springer, vol. 36(1), pages 41-58, February.
    17. Karen Mason, 1997. "Explaining fertility transitions," Demography, Springer, vol. 34(4), pages 443-454, November.
    18. Gary S. Becker, 1981. "A Treatise on the Family," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number beck81-1, May.
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