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The Relative Returns to Graduating from a Historically Black College/University: Propensity Score Matching Estimates from the National Survey of Black Americans

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Author Info

  • Gregory Price

    ()

  • William Spriggs

    ()

  • Omari Swinton

    ()

Abstract

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s12114-011-9088-0
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Springer in its journal The Review of Black Political Economy.

Volume (Year): 38 (2011)
Issue (Month): 2 (June)
Pages: 103-130

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Handle: RePEc:spr:blkpoe:v:38:y:2011:i:2:p:103-130

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Web page: http://www.springer.com/economics/journal/12114
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Related research

Keywords: Black Colleges/Universities; Labor market outcomes; Matching estimators; I23; J01; J15;

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References

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Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
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  1. Goldsmith, Arthur H & Veum, Jonathan R & Darity, William, Jr, 1997. "The Impact of Psychological and Human Capital on Wages," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 35(4), pages 815-29, October.
  2. Jill M. Constantine, 1995. "The effect of attending historically black colleges and universities on future wages of black students," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 48(3), pages 531-546, April.
  3. Dale, Stacy & Krueger, Alan B., 2011. "Estimating the Return to College Selectivity over the Career Using Administrative Earning Data," IZA Discussion Papers 5533, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  4. Alberto Abadie & David Drukker & Jane Leber Herr & Guido W. Imbens, 2004. "Implementing matching estimators for average treatment effects in Stata," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, vol. 4(3), pages 290-311, September.
  5. Zhong Zhao, 2004. "Using Matching to Estimate Treatment Effects: Data Requirements, Matching Metrics, and Monte Carlo Evidence," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 86(1), pages 91-107, February.
  6. Augurzky, Boris & Kluve, Jochen, 2004. "Assessing the Performance of Matching Algorithms When Selection into Treatment Is Strong," IZA Discussion Papers 1301, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  7. Roland G. Fryer & Michael Greenstone, 2010. "The Changing Consequences of Attending Historically Black Colleges and Universities," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 2(1), pages 116-48, January.
  8. Mickey L. Burnim, 1980. "The earnings effect of black matriculation in predominantly white colleges," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 33(4), pages 518-524, July.
  9. Mykerezi, Elton & Mills, Bradford F., 2004. "Education and Economic Well-Being in Racially Diverse Rural Counties: The Role of Historically Black Colleges and Universities," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 34(3), pages 303-19.
  10. Ronald G. Ehrenberg & Donna S. Rothstein, 1993. "Do Historically Black Institutions of Higher Education Confer Unique Advantages on Black Students: An Initial Analysis," NBER Working Papers 4356, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  11. Dan Black & Amelia Haviland & Seth Sanders & Lowell Taylor, 2006. "Why Do Minority Men Earn Less? A Study of Wage Differentials among the Highly Educated," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 88(2), pages 300-313, May.
  12. Dominic J. Brewer & Eric R. Eide & Ronald G. Ehrenberg, 1999. "Does It Pay to Attend an Elite Private College? Cross-Cohort Evidence on the Effects of College Type on Earnings," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 34(1), pages 104-123.
  13. Darity, William Jr. & Mason, Patrick L. & Stewart, James B., 2006. "The economics of identity: The origin and persistence of racial identity norms," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 60(3), pages 283-305, July.
  14. Alejandro Gaviria & Steven Raphael, 2001. "School-Based Peer Effects And Juvenile Behavior," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 83(2), pages 257-268, May.
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Cited by:
  1. Gregory Price, 2013. "Hurricane Katrina as an Experiment in Housing Mobility and Neighborhood Effects: Were the Relocated Poor Black Evacuees Better-Off?," The Review of Black Political Economy, Springer, vol. 40(2), pages 121-143, June.

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