Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

Labour or Total Factor Productivity: Do We Need to Choose?

Contents:

Author Info

  • Timothy C. Sargent

    ()

  • Edgard R. Rodriguez

Abstract

. In this article, as part of the symposium on total factor productivity, Timothy C. Sargent and Edgard R. Rodriquez of Finance Canada discuss the issue of the choice between labour and total factor productivity. They conclude that both measures have uses. For periods of less than a decade, labour productivity is the preferred measure, but for longer periods total factor productivity is superior. When capital stock estimates are of poor quality, it is better to use labour productivity.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.csls.ca/ipm/1/sargent-e.pdf
Download Restriction: no

File URL: http://www.csls.ca/ipm/1/sargent-f.pdf
File Function: version en francais, pp:41-44
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Centre for the Study of Living Standards in its journal International Productivity Monitor.

Volume (Year): 1 (2000)
Issue (Month): (Fall)
Pages: 41-44

as in new window
Handle: RePEc:sls:ipmsls:v:1:y:2000:7

Contact details of provider:
Postal: 151 Slater Street, Suite 710, Ottawa, ON K1P 5H3
Phone: 613-233-8891
Fax: 613-233-8250
Email:
Web page: http://www.csls.ca/
More information through EDIRC

Order Information:
Email:
Web: http://www.csls.ca

Related research

Keywords: Total Factor Productivity; Labor Productivity; Productivity; Labour; Measurement; Capital Stock; Neoclassical Model; Growth; Data; Comparison; Growth Model;

Other versions of this item:

Find related papers by JEL classification:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Charles R. Hulten, 2000. "Total Factor Productivity: A Short Biography," NBER Working Papers 7471, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Romer, Paul M, 1987. "Growth Based on Increasing Returns Due to Specialization," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 77(2), pages 56-62, May.
  3. Greenwood, Jeremy & Hercowitz, Zvi & Krusell, Per, 1997. "Long-Run Implications of Investment-Specific Technological Change," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 87(3), pages 342-62, June.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. R. Quentin Grafton & Stephen Knowles & P. Dorian Owen, 2002. "Social Divergence and Productivity: Making a Connection," The Review of Economic Performance and Social Progress, in: Andrew Sharpe, Executive Director & France St-Hilaire, Vice-President , Research & Keith Banting, Di (ed.), The Review of Economic Performance and Social Progress 2002: Towards a Social Understanding of Productivity, volume 2 Centre for the Study of Living Standards & The Institutute for Research on Public Policy.
  2. Carlo Bernini Carri, 2005. "Productivity Growth and Convergence between Agriculture and Industry in EU Countries," QA - Rivista dell'Associazione Rossi-Doria, Associazione Rossi Doria, issue 4, November.
  3. Khaled Elmawazini & Gamal Atallah & Sonny Nwankwo & Yazid Dissou, 2013. "US Foreign Affiliates, Technology Diffusion and Host Country Human Development: Human Development Index versus Human Capital," Industry and Innovation, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(1), pages 69-91, January.
  4. Leandro N. Carrera & Patrick Dunleavy & Simon Bastow, 2009. "Understanding productivity trends in UK tax collection," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 25532, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  5. Andrew Sharpe & Olivier Guibaud, 2005. "Indicators of Innovation in Canadian Natural Resource Industries," CSLS Research Reports 2005-03, Centre for the Study of Living Standards.
  6. Basak Dalgic & Burcu Fazlioglu & Deniz Karaoglan, 2014. "Entry to Foreign Markets and Productivity: Evidence from a Matched Sample of Turkish Manufacturing Firms," ERC Working Papers 1403, ERC - Economic Research Center, Middle East Technical University, revised May 2014.
  7. Tibor Lalinsky, 2013. "Firm competitiveness determinants: results of a panel data analysis," Working and Discussion Papers WP 4/2013, Research Department, National Bank of Slovakia.
  8. Erdal Atukeren, 2005. "R&D Races and Spillovers between the EU and the US: Some Causal Evidence," KOF Working papers 05-105, KOF Swiss Economic Institute, ETH Zurich.
  9. Andrew Sharpe, 2001. "Productivity Trends in the Construction Sector in Canada: A Case of Lagging Technical Progress," International Productivity Monitor, Centre for the Study of Living Standards, vol. 3, pages 52-68, Fall.
  10. Luthfi Fatah, 2007. "The Potentials of Agro-Industry for Growth Promotion and Equality Improvement in Indonesia," Asian Journal of Agriculture and Development, Southeast Asian Regional Center for Graduate Study and Research in Agriculture, vol. 4(1), pages 57-74, June.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:sls:ipmsls:v:1:y:2000:7. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Whitney Hamilton) The email address of this maintainer does not seem to be valid anymore. Please ask Whitney Hamilton to update the entry or send us the correct address.

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.