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Physician Financial Incentives and Cesarean Section Delivery

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  • Jonathan Gruber
  • Maria Owings

Abstract

The "induced-demand" model states that in the face of negative income shocks, physicians may exploit their agency relationship with patients by providing excessive care. We test this model using an exogenous change in the financial environment facing obstetrician/

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by The RAND Corporation in its journal RAND Journal of Economics.

Volume (Year): 27 (1996)
Issue (Month): 1 (Spring)
Pages: 99-123

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Handle: RePEc:rje:randje:v:27:y:1996:i:spring:p:99-123

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References

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  1. T Rice & R Labelle, 1989. "Do Physicians Induce Demand for Medical Service?," Centre for Health Economics and Policy Analysis Working Paper Series 18, Centre for Health Economics and Policy Analysis (CHEPA), McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada.
  2. Thomas G. McGuire & Mark V. Pauly, 1991. "Physician Response to Fee Changes with Multiple Payers," Papers 0015, Boston University - Industry Studies Programme.
  3. McGuire, Thomas G. & Pauly, Mark V., 1991. "Physician response to fee changes with multiple payers," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 10(4), pages 385-410.
  4. Victor R. Fuchs, 1978. "The Supply of Surgeons and the Demand for Operations," NBER Working Papers 0236, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. David Bloom & James Trussell, 1984. "What are the determinants of delayed childbearing and permanent childlessness in the United States?," Demography, Springer, vol. 21(4), pages 591-611, November.
  6. Cromwell, Jerry & Mitchell, Janet B., 1986. "Physician-induced demand for surgery," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 5(4), pages 293-313, December.
  7. David E. Bloom & James Trussell, 1983. "What Are the Determinants of Delayed Childbearing and Permanent Childlessness in the United States?," NBER Working Papers 1140, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Goddeeris, John H, 1984. "Medical Insurance, Technological Change, and Welfare," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 22(1), pages 56-67, January.
  9. Grytten, Jostein & Holst, Dorthe & Laake, Peter, 1990. "Supplier inducement : Its effect on dental services in Norway," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 9(4), pages 483-491, December.
  10. J Hurley & R Labelle & T Rice, 1990. "The Relationship Between Physician Fees and the Utilization of Medical Services in Ontario," Centre for Health Economics and Policy Analysis Working Paper Series 1990-04, Centre for Health Economics and Policy Analysis (CHEPA), McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Dulleck, Uwe & Johnston, David W. & Kerschbamer, Rudolf & Sutter, Matthias, 2012. "The Good, the Bad and the Naive: Do Fair Prices Signal Good Types or Do They Induce Good Behaviour?," IZA Discussion Papers 6491, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Jeffrey Clemens & Joshua D. Gottlieb, 2012. "Do Physicians' Financial Incentives Affect Medical Treatment and Patient Health?," Discussion Papers 11-017, Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research.
  3. Lu, Fangwen, 2014. "Insurance coverage and agency problems in doctor prescriptions: Evidence from a field experiment in China," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 106(C), pages 156-167.
  4. David Cutler & Jonathan Skinner & Ariel Dora Stern & David Wennberg, 2013. "Physician Beliefs and Patient Preferences: A New Look at Regional Variation in Health Care Spending," NBER Working Papers 19320, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Christopher C. Afendulis & Daniel P. Kessler, 2006. "Tradeoffs from Integrating Diagnosis and Treatment in Markets for Health Care," NBER Working Papers 12623, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Adrian Beck & Rudolf Kerschbamer & Jianying Qiu & Matthias Sutter, 2014. "Car Mechanics in the Lab - Investigating the Behavior of Real Experts on Experimental Markets for Credence Goods," Working Papers 2014-02, Faculty of Economics and Statistics, University of Innsbruck.
  7. Jonathan Skinner & John E. Wennberg, 1998. "How Much is Enough? Efficiency and Medicare Spending in the Last Six Months of Life," NBER Working Papers 6513, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Steven D. Levitt & Chad Syverson, 2005. "Market Distortions when Agents are Better Informed: The Value of Information in Real Estate Transactions," NBER Working Papers 11053, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  9. Conlin, Michael & Orsini, Joe & Tang, Meng-Chi, 2013. "The effect of an agent’s expertise on National Football League contract structure," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 121(2), pages 275-281.
  10. Borzekowski, Ron, 2009. "Measuring the cost impact of hospital information systems: 1987-1994," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(5), pages 938-949, September.
  11. Stéphane Jacobzone & Lise Rochaix, 1997. "L'hypothèse de demande induite : un bilan économique," Économie et Prévision, Programme National Persée, vol. 129(3), pages 25-36.
  12. Janet Currie & Jonathan Gruber, 1997. "The Technology of Birth: Health Insurance, Medical Interventions, and Infant Health," NBER Working Papers 5985, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  13. Wayne Dunham, 2003. "Moral Hazard and the Market for Used Automobiles," Review of Industrial Organization, Springer, vol. 23(1), pages 65-83, August.
  14. Uwe Dulleck & Rudolf Kerschbamer & Matthias Sutter, 2011. "The Economics of Credence Goods: An Experiment on the Role of Liability, Verifiability, Reputation, and Competition," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(2), pages 526-55, April.
  15. Maarten Janssen & Alexei Parakhonyak, 2011. "Sårvice Refusal in Regulated Markets for Credence Goods," HSE Working papers WP BRP 08/EC/2011, National Research University Higher School of Economics.
  16. Patrick Bajari & Han Hong & Minjung Park & Robert Town, 2011. "Regression Discontinuity Designs with an Endogenous Forcing Variable and an Application to Contracting in Health Care," NBER Working Papers 17643, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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