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Demography and Growth

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Author Info

  • Jamie Hall

    (Reserve Bank of Australia)

  • Andrew Stone

    (Reserve Bank of Australia)

Abstract

Substantial demographic shifts are under way in many countries which could have a sizeable impact on trend growth rates over coming decades. This article explores some of these demographic developments, particularly in relation to population growth and age structure, for a range of economies. It also examines some of the direct effects that these changes could have on average growth over the next 10 years.

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File URL: http://www.rba.gov.au/publications/bulletin/2010/jun/pdf/bu-0610-3.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Reserve Bank of Australia in its journal RBA Bulletin.

Volume (Year): (2010)
Issue (Month): (June)
Pages: 15-23

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Handle: RePEc:rba:rbabul:jun2010-03

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Related research

Keywords: demography; trend growth; dependency ratios; ageing;

References

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  1. Kulish Mariano & Kent Christopher & Smith Kathryn, 2010. "Aging, Retirement, and Savings: A General Equilibrium Analysis," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, De Gruyter, vol. 10(1), pages 1-32, July.
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Cited by:
  1. Jürgen Faik, 2012. "Impacts of an Ageing Society on Macroeconomics and Income Inequality: The Case of Germany since the 1980s," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 518, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
  2. Thammarak Moenjak & Kengjai Watjanapukka & Oramone Chantapant & Teeravit Pobsukhirun, 2010. "New Globalization: Risks and Opportunities for Thailand in the Next Decade," Working Papers, Economic Research Department, Bank of Thailand 2010-04, Economic Research Department, Bank of Thailand.
  3. Anthony Rush, 2011. "China's Labour Market," RBA Bulletin, Reserve Bank of Australia, Reserve Bank of Australia, pages 29-38, September.

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