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Oltre la scuola dellÕobbligo. Un' analisi empirica della decisione di proseguire nellÕistruzione post-obbligatoria in Italia

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  • Massimiliano Bratti

    ()
    (Universitˆ degli Studi di Ancona, Dipartimento di Economia, Ancona e University of Warwick, Department of Economics, Coventry (Regno Unito))

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    Abstract

    In this paper we analyse the decision to continue in post-compulsory education in Italy. Using data from the Survey of Household Income and Wealth (SHIW) of the Bank of Italy we estimate binary choice models (probit and logit) with the primary aim of investigating factors which affect the decision to continue in post-compulsory education. The estimates of the econometric model show that the individual with the smallest probability to continue in education has one or more of the following attributes: residence in the South, in big towns, father without formal education, self-employed or working in the agricultural sector, mother with less than high secondary schooling (licenza media superiore). The role of family income in shaping educational decisions is especially important in Central and Southern Italy, where income levels are lower. The economic variables whose role is emphasised by the mainstream approach to educational choices, the theory of human capital, turn out not to be significant in the explanation of post-compulsory schooling in Italy where social and long-term and short-term family factors appear to be dominant.

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    File URL: http://ojs.uniroma1.it/index.php/monetaecredito/article/view/9774/9660
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Economia civile in its journal Moneta e Credito.

    Volume (Year): 54 (2001)
    Issue (Month): 214 ()
    Pages: 175-203

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    Handle: RePEc:psl:moneta:2001:22

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    Related research

    Keywords: Education; Schooling;

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    1. Stephen V. Cameron & James J. Heckman, 1999. "The Dynamics of Educational Attainment for Blacks, Hispanics, and Whites," NBER Working Papers 7249, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Shea, John, 2000. "Does parents' money matter?," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 77(2), pages 155-184, August.
    3. Sonia R Bhalotra & Chris Heady, 2000. "Child Farm Labour: Theory and Evidence," STICERD - Development Economics Papers - From 2008 this series has been superseded by Economic Organisation and Public Policy Discussion Papers 24, Suntory and Toyota International Centres for Economics and Related Disciplines, LSE.
    4. James J. Heckman, 1999. "Policies to Foster Human Capital," NBER Working Papers 7288, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Susan Dynarski, 2000. "Hope for Whom? Financial Aid for the Middle Class and Its Impact on College Attendance," NBER Working Papers 7756, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Dynarski, Susan, 2001. "Does Aid Matter? Measuring the Effect of Student Aid on College Attendance and Completion," Working Paper Series rwp01-034, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
    7. Stephen V. Cameron & James J. Heckman, 1998. "Life Cycle Schooling and Dynamic Selection Bias: Models and Evidence for Five Cohorts of American Males," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 106(2), pages 262-333, April.
    8. Rice, Patricia G, 1987. "The Demand for Post-compulsory Education in the UK and the Effects of Educational Maintenance Allowances," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 54(216), pages 465-75, November.
    9. Brunello, Giorgio & Comi, Simona & Lucifora, Claudio, 2000. "The Returns to Education in Italy: A New Look at the Evidence," IZA Discussion Papers 130, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    10. Dynarski, Susan, 2000. "Hope for Whom? Financial Aid for the Middle Class and Its Impact on College Attendance," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association, vol. 53(n. 3), pages 629-62, September.
    11. Stafford, Frank P, 1987. "Women's Work, Sibling Competition, and Children's School Performance," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 77(5), pages 972-80, December.
    12. Brunello, Giorgio & Miniaci, Raffaele, 1999. "The economic returns to schooling for Italian men. An evaluation based on instrumental variables1," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 6(4), pages 509-519, November.
    13. Kodde, David A, 1986. "Uncertainty and the Demand for Education," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 68(3), pages 460-67, August.
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