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Franco Modigliani and the life-cycle theory of consumption

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  • Angus Deaton

    ()
    (Princeton University, Research Program in Development Studies and Center for Health and Wellbeing, Woodrow Wilson School, Princeton (USA))

Abstract

This paper reviews and discusses the contribution by Franco Modigliani to macroeconomic model building for economist forecasting and policy making. As Paul Samuelson observed, Modigliani's theoretical work was fundamental in the development of the basic framework within which the "post-Keynesian eclecticism" of the later twentieth century developed. In the move from theory to practice two aspects of Modigliani's work are considered: 1) the systemic approach that focuses on the relationship between the short and the long term, 2) the special reference to the mechanism of monetary policy transmission in the use of the macroeconomic model for economic stabilisation policy. What is left today of this contribution is finally briefly discussed, also with reference to some recent proposals on macroeconomic model building.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Banca Nazionale del Lavoro in its journal Banca Nazionale del Lavoro Quarterly Review.

Volume (Year): 58 (2005)
Issue (Month): 233-234 ()
Pages: 91-107

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Handle: RePEc:psl:bnlqrr:2005:28

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Related research

Keywords: Consumption; Life Cycle; Macroeconomics;

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  1. Banks, James & Blundell, Richard & Tanner, Sarah, 1998. "Is There a Retirement-Savings Puzzle?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(4), pages 769-88, September.
  2. Deaton, A., 1989. "Saving And Liquidity Constraints," Papers, Princeton, Woodrow Wilson School - Public and International Affairs 153, Princeton, Woodrow Wilson School - Public and International Affairs.
  3. Pierre-Olivier Gourinchas & Jonathan A. Parker, 2002. "Consumption Over the Life Cycle," Econometrica, Econometric Society, Econometric Society, vol. 70(1), pages 47-89, January.
  4. Kotlikoff, Laurence J, 1988. "Intergenerational Transfers and Savings," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 2(2), pages 41-58, Spring.
  5. Hall, Robert E, 1978. "Stochastic Implications of the Life Cycle-Permanent Income Hypothesis: Theory and Evidence," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, University of Chicago Press, vol. 86(6), pages 971-87, December.
  6. Flavin, Marjorie A, 1981. "The Adjustment of Consumption to Changing Expectations about Future Income," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, University of Chicago Press, vol. 89(5), pages 974-1009, October.
  7. Christopher D. Carroll, 1996. "Buffer-Stock Saving and the Life Cycle/Permanent Income Hypothesis," NBER Working Papers 5788, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. William A. Barnett & Robert Solow, 2004. "An Interview with Franco Modigliani," Macroeconomics, EconWPA 0409002, EconWPA.
  9. Barro, Robert J, 1974. "Are Government Bonds Net Wealth?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, University of Chicago Press, vol. 82(6), pages 1095-1117, Nov.-Dec..
  10. Christopher Harris & David Laibson, 1999. "Dynamic Choices of Hyperbolic Consumers," Harvard Institute of Economic Research Working Papers 1886, Harvard - Institute of Economic Research.
  11. Chris Carroll & Lawrence H. Summers, 1989. "Consumption Growth Parallels Income Growth: Some New Evidence," NBER Working Papers 3090, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  12. Laibson, David, 1997. "Golden Eggs and Hyperbolic Discounting," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, MIT Press, vol. 112(2), pages 443-77, May.
  13. Modigliani, Franco, 1988. "The Role of Intergenerational Transfers and Life Cycle Saving in the Accumulation of Wealth," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 2(2), pages 15-40, Spring.
  14. Richard Thaler & Shlomo Benartzi, 2004. "Save more tomorrow: Using behavioral economics to increase employee saving," Natural Field Experiments 00337, The Field Experiments Website.
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Cited by:
  1. Jappelli, Tullio & Padula, Mario & Pistaferri, Luigi, 2007. "A Direct Test of the Buffer Stock Model of Saving," CEPR Discussion Papers 6576, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  2. Alfred Michael Dockery & Sherry Bawa, 2013. "The Impact of Children on Australian Couples' Wealth Accumulation," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Working Paper series WP1302, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.

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