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Labor Supply Effects of the Earned Income Tax Credit: Evidence from Wisconsin's Supplemental Benefit for Families with Three Children

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  • Cancian, Maria
  • Levinson, Arik

Abstract

We examine the effect of the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) on labor supply, comparing outcomes in Wisconsin, which supplements the federal EITC for families with three children, to outcomes in states that do not supplement the federal EITC. Relative to previous studies, our cross–state comparison examines a larger difference in EITC subsidy rates, more similar treatment and control groups, and a policy that has been in place longer. Whereas most previous research has found significant effects of the EITC on labor force participation, we find no effect

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by National Tax Association in its journal National Tax Journal.

Volume (Year): 59 (2006)
Issue (Month): 4 (December)
Pages: 781-800

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Handle: RePEc:ntj:journl:v:59:y:2006:i:4:p:781-800

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References

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  1. David Neumark & William Wascher, 2000. "Using the EITC to Increase Family Earnings: New Evidence and a Comparison with the Minimum Wage," JCPR Working Papers 134, Northwestern University/University of Chicago Joint Center for Poverty Research.
  2. Scholz, John Karl, 1994. "The Earned Income Credit: Participation, Compliance, and Antipoverty Effectiveness," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association, vol. 47(1), pages 63-87, March.
  3. V. Joseph Hotz, 2003. "The Earned Income Tax Credit," NBER Chapters, in: Means-Tested Transfer Programs in the United States, pages 141-198 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. N. Eissa & H. W. Hoynes, . "The Earned Income Tax Credit and the Labor Supply of Married Couples," Institute for Research on Poverty Discussion Papers 1194-99, University of Wisconsin Institute for Research on Poverty.
  5. Jeffrey Grogger, 2003. "The Effects of Time Limits, the EITC, and Other Policy Changes on Welfare Use, Work, and Income among Female-Headed Families," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 85(2), pages 394-408, May.
  6. Eissa, Nada & Liebman, Jeffrey B, 1996. "Labor Supply Response to the Earned Income Tax Credit," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 111(2), pages 605-37, May.
  7. Marianne Bertrand & Esther Duflo & Sendhil Mullainathan, 2004. "How Much Should We Trust Differences-in-Differences Estimates?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 119(1), pages 249-275, February.
  8. Bruce D. Meyer & Dan T. Rosenbaum, 1999. "Making Single Mothers Work: Recent Tax and Welfare Policy and its Effects," JCPR Working Papers 152, Northwestern University/University of Chicago Joint Center for Poverty Research.
  9. Meyer, Bruce D. & Rosenbaum, Dan T., 2000. "Making Single Mothers Work: Recent Tax and Welfare Policy and its Effects," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association, vol. 53(n. 4), pages 1027-62, December.
  10. Stacy Dickert & Scott Houser & John Karl Scholz, 1995. "The Earned Income Tax Credit and Transfer Programs: A Study of Labor Market and Program Participation," NBER Chapters, in: Tax Policy and the Economy, Volume 9, pages 1-50 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  11. Bruce D. Meyer & Dan T. Rosenbaum, 1999. "Welfare, the Earned Income Tax Credit, and the Labor Supply of Single Mothers," NBER Working Papers 7363, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  12. Ellwood, David T., 2000. "The Impact of the Earned Income Tax Credit and Social Policy Reforms on Work, Marriage, and Living Arrangements," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association, vol. 53(n. 4), pages 1063-1106, December.
  13. J. K. Scholz, . "The earned income tax credit: Participation, compliance, and antipoverty effectiveness," Institute for Research on Poverty Discussion Papers 1020-93, University of Wisconsin Institute for Research on Poverty.
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Cited by:
  1. David Neumark, 2009. "Alternative Labor Market Policies to Increase Economic Self-Sufficiency: Mandating Higher Wages, Subsidizing Employment, and Increasing Productivity," NBER Working Papers 14807, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Gomis-Porqueras, Pedro & Mitnik, Oscar A. & Peralta-Alva, Adrian & Schmeiser, Maximilian D., 2011. "The Effects of Female Labor Force Participation on Obesity," IZA Discussion Papers 6071, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  3. Tiefenthaler, Jill & Simpson, Nicole & Hyde, Jameson, 2008. "The Impact of the Earned Income Tax Credit on Economic Well-being: A Comparison across Household Types," Working Papers 2008-02, Department of Economics, Colgate University.
  4. David Neumark & William Wascher, 2007. "Does a Higher Minimum Wage Enhance the Effectiveness of The Earned Income Tax Credit?," NBER Working Papers 12915, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Christos Koulovatianos & Carsten Schröder & Ulrich Schmidt, . "Nonmarket Household Time and the Cost of Children," Discussion Papers 08/07, University of Nottingham, Centre for Finance, Credit and Macroeconomics (CFCM).
  6. Samara Potter Gunter, 2010. "State Earned Income Tax Credits and Participation in Regular and Informal Work," Working Papers 1298, Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Center for Research on Child Wellbeing..
  7. Kartik Athreya & Devin Reilly & Nicole B. Simpson, 2010. "Earned income tax credit recipients: income, marginal tax rates, wealth, and credit constraints," Economic Quarterly, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, issue 3Q, pages 229-258.
  8. Kenneth A. Couch & Douglas J. Besharov & David Neumark, 2013. "Spurring Job Creation in Response to Severe Recessions: Reconsidering Hiring Credits," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 32(1), pages 142-171, 01.
  9. Gunter, Samara, 2013. "State Earned Income Tax Credits And Participation In Regular And Informal Work," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association, vol. 66(1), pages 33-62, March.
  10. Chris Herbst, 2010. "The labor supply effects of child care costs and wages in the presence of subsidies and the earned income tax credit," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 8(2), pages 199-230, June.
  11. Averett, Susan L. & Wang, Yang, 2012. "The Effects of EITC Payment Expansion on Maternal Smoking," IZA Discussion Papers 6680, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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