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Mobility behavior of the elderly: an attitude-based segmentation approach for a heterogeneous target group

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  • Sonja Haustein

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    Abstract

    The western population is ageing. Based on the assumption that the elderly are a quite heterogeneous population group with an increasing impact on the transport system, mobility types of the elderly were identified. By means of 1,500 standardized telephone interviews, mobility behavior and possible determinantes including infrastructural, sociodemographic and attitudinal variables, were assessed. The most important factors, identified by five regression analyses, served as type-constituent variables in a series of cluster analyses. The final cluster solution resulted in four segments of the elderly named Captive Car Users, Affluent Mobiles, Self-Determined Mobiles, and Captive Public Transport Users. The groups showed distinct mobility patterns as well as significant differences in infrastructural, sociodemographic and attitudinal variables. The study provides a more comprehensive understanding of the diverse lifestyles, attitudes, travel behavior and needs of the elderly. Furthermore, it identifies starting points for the reduction of car use. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media, LLC. 2012

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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s11116-011-9380-7
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Springer in its journal Transportation.

    Volume (Year): 39 (2012)
    Issue (Month): 6 (November)
    Pages: 1079-1103

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    Handle: RePEc:kap:transp:v:39:y:2012:i:6:p:1079-1103

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    Web page: http://www.springerlink.com/link.asp?id=103007

    Related research

    Keywords: Elderly travel; Mobility behavior; Segmentation; Target-group; Attitudes; Ageing population;

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    1. Anable, Jillian & Gatersleben, Birgitta, 2005. "All work and no play? The role of instrumental and affective factors in work and leisure journeys by different travel modes," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 39(2-3), pages 163-181.
    2. Steg, Linda, 2005. "Car use: lust and must. Instrumental, symbolic and affective motives for car use," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 39(2-3), pages 147-162.
    3. Ajzen, Icek, 1991. "The theory of planned behavior," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 50(2), pages 179-211, December.
    4. Sandra Rosenbloom, 2001. "Sustainability and automobility among the elderly: An international assessment," Transportation, Springer, vol. 28(4), pages 375-408, November.
    5. Eric Hildebrand, 2003. "Dimensions in elderly travel behaviour: A simplified activity-based model using lifestyle clusters," Transportation, Springer, vol. 30(3), pages 285-306, August.
    6. Golob, Thomas F., 2001. "Joint models of attitudes and behavior in evaluation of the San Diego I-15 congestion pricing project," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 35(6), pages 495-514, July.
    7. Anable, Jillian, 2005. "'Complacent Car Addicts' or 'Aspiring Environmentalists'? Identifying travel behaviour segments using attitude theory," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 12(1), pages 65-78, January.
    8. Alsnih, Rahaf & Hensher, David A., 2003. "The mobility and accessibility expectations of seniors in an aging population," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 37(10), pages 903-916, December.
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    Cited by:
    1. Siren, Anu & Haustein, Sonja, 2013. "Baby boomers’ mobility patterns and preferences: What are the implications for future transport?," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 29(C), pages 136-144.

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