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Leaving Careers in IT: Gender Differences in Retention

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  • Paula Stephan

    ()

  • Sharon Levin

Abstract

The low prevalence of women in the information technology (IT) workforce has received considerable attention in recent years. The focus of much of this discussion concerns how women can be recruited into careers in IT by making careers more attractive and accessible to women. The size of the IT workforce depends on retention as well as recruitment. The focus of this study is on retention, examining factors related to retention and how retention varies by gender. Data for the study come from the Scientists and Engineers Statistical Data System (SESTAT) compiled by Science Resources Statistics (SRS), National Science Foundation (NSF). We find that retention varies by gender and that a sizeable proportion of IT-trained women who are not working in IT jobs leave the labor force rather than take positions in other occupations. We also find that marriage and family play different roles for women and men in affecting retention. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2005

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s10961-005-2583-3
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Springer in its journal The Journal of Technology Transfer.

Volume (Year): 30 (2005)
Issue (Month): 4 (October)
Pages: 383-396

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Handle: RePEc:kap:jtecht:v:30:y:2005:i:4:p:383-396

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Web page: http://www.springerlink.com/link.asp?id=104998

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  1. Claudia Goldin, 2004. "The Long Road to the Fast Track: Career and Family," NBER Working Papers 10331, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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Cited by:
  1. Hunt, Jennifer, 2012. "Why Do Women Leave Science and Engineering?," IZA Discussion Papers 6885, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Rajeev Goel & Devrim Göktepe-Hultén, 2013. "Nascent entrepreneurship and inventive activity: a somewhat new perspective," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 38(4), pages 471-485, August.
  3. Lisa D. Cook & Chaleampong Kongcharoen, 2010. "The Idea Gap in Pink and Black," NBER Working Papers 16331, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Devrim Göktepe-Hulten & Prashanth Mahagaonkar, 2010. "Inventing and patenting activities of scientists: in the expectation of money or reputation?," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 35(4), pages 401-423, August.

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