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The Economics of a Temporary VAT Cut

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  • Thomas F. Crossley
  • Hamish Low
  • Matthew Wakefield

Abstract

1. The rate of VAT has been cut temporarily to 15%, with a return to 17.5% in place for the end of 2009. The government has predicted that this will increase consumer spending by about 0.5%. Much of the analysis of this tax cut has been critical of the policy and concluded that the government's estimates of the impact on spending are over-optimistic. The source of this criticism is a misunderstanding of the mechanism through which the tax cut will have an impact. In fact, we believe the government's estimates are overly-pessimistic. 2. There are two mechanisms through which the temporary VAT cut might affect spending: first, it will increase spending power, making households feel as if they have more income. This mechanism is likely to be small partly because the tax cut increases income only for one year, and so the increase in total lifetime resources is very small, and partly because the lost revenue will have to be paid back. 3. However, the second (often ignored) mechanism is likely to be much more important. This second mechanism is the effect that the tax cut will have through changing the price of goods bought in 2009 compared to 2010: the cost of goods bought in 2009 has fallen compared to goods bought in 2010 and this change in prices gives an incentive to bring forward consumer spending to this year, rather than waiting until next. 4. Economic evidence on households' willingness to move spending from one year into an earlier (or later) year suggests that a 1% fall in the price today will translate into a 1% increase in spending. Since roughly only half of goods purchased are subject to VAT, the cut in the rate by 2.5% is like a cut in prices today by 1.25% and we would expect this to boost spending by about 1.25% over what it would otherwise be. 5. Of course, this issue of what the spending would otherwise be is crucial: we will not now know what spending in 2009 would have been without the cut in VAT and even with the VAT cut, spending is likely to d

(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Institute for Fiscal Studies in its journal Fiscal Studies.

Volume (Year): 30 (2009)
Issue (Month): 1 (03)
Pages: 3-16

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Handle: RePEc:ifs:fistud:v:30:y:2009:i:1:p:3-16

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Cited by:
  1. Gonzalo Fernandez-de-Cordoba & Jose L Torres, 2011. "The Transitory VAT Cut in the UK: A Dynamic General Equilibrium Analysis," Economic Issues Journal Articles, Economic Issues, vol. 16(1), pages 1-18, March.
  2. David CASHIN & UNAYAMA Takashi, 2012. "Short-run Distributional Effects of VAT Rate Change: Evidence from a consumption tax rate increase in Japan," Discussion papers 12029, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
  3. Sule Alan & Kadir Atalay & Thomas F. Crossley, 2012. "Euler Equation Estimation on Micro Data," Koç University-TUSIAD Economic Research Forum Working Papers 1221, Koc University-TUSIAD Economic Research Forum.

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