Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

The quantity and character of out-of-market small business lending

Contents:

Author Info

  • Elizabeth S. Laderman
Registered author(s):

    Abstract

    Most small business lending from banks originates with institutions that have a local branch, but “out-of-market” lending does not. Supporting the view that proximity is conducive to lending, I find that only about 10 percent of small business lending is from banks with no branch in the local market. About half of this appears to be from banks with a branch in the same state, further supporting the role of proximity, while, at the same time, supporting the current regulatory practice of considering out-of-market loans when assessing local competitive conditions. I also find that out-of-market and in-market loans are of similar average size and are about equally likely to be secured by commercial real estate.

    Download Info

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
    File URL: http://www.frbsf.org/economic-research/publications/economic-review/2008/er31-39.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco in its journal Economic Review.

    Volume (Year): (2008)
    Issue (Month): ()
    Pages: 31-39

    as in new window
    Handle: RePEc:fip:fedfer:y:2008:p:31-39

    Contact details of provider:
    Postal: P.O. Box 7702, San Francisco, CA 94120-7702
    Phone: (415) 974-2000
    Fax: (415) 974-3333
    Email:
    Web page: http://www.frbsf.org/
    More information through EDIRC

    Order Information:
    Email:

    Related research

    Keywords: Loans ; Bank loans ; Small business - Finance;

    References

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
    as in new window
    1. Jalal Akhavein & W. Scott Frame & Lawrence J. White, 2001. "The Diffusion of Financial Innovations: An Examination of The Adoption of Small Business Credit Scoring by Large Banking Organizations," Center for Financial Institutions Working Papers 01-19, Wharton School Center for Financial Institutions, University of Pennsylvania.
    2. W. Scott Frame & Lynn Woosley, 2004. "Credit Scoring and the Availability of Small Business Credit in Low- and Moderate-Income Areas," The Financial Review, Eastern Finance Association, vol. 39(1), pages 35-54, 02.
    3. Berger, Allen N. & Udell, Gregory F., 2006. "A more complete conceptual framework for SME finance," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 30(11), pages 2945-2966, November.
    4. Kenneth P. Brevoort & Timothy H. Hannan, 2004. "Commercial lending and distance: evidence from Community Reinvestment Act data," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2004-24, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    5. Frame, W Scott & Srinivasan, Aruna & Woosley, Lynn, 2001. "The Effect of Credit Scoring on Small-Business Lending," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 33(3), pages 813-25, August.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Lists

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:fip:fedfer:y:2008:p:31-39. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Diane Rosenberger).

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.