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25Years of Aid Allocation Practice: Whither Selectivity?

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  • Clist, Paul

Abstract

The 4P framework (Poverty, Population, Policy, and Proximity) is introduced as a way of understanding a donor’s aid allocation. We use the two-part model and examine the period 1982–2006. The results indicate that recent conclusions of increasing selectivity are misplaced for the seven major donors analyzed, who together represent the majority of development aid. Indeed, the effect of each of the commonly mentioned time-trends (selectivity, the end of the Cold War, and the commencement of the Global War on Terror) is much smaller than the role of donor heterogeneity, which appears sizeable and entrenched.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal World Development.

Volume (Year): 39 (2011)
Issue (Month): 10 ()
Pages: 1724-1734

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Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:39:y:2011:i:10:p:1724-1734

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/worlddev

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Keywords: foreign aid; aid allocation; selectivity; governance;

References

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  18. McGillivray, Mark, 2003. "Modelling Aid Allocation: Issues, Approaches and Results," Working Paper Series, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER) UNU-WIDER Research Paper , World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
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Cited by:
  1. Abbott, Andrew & Jones, Philip, 2012. "Government spending: Is development assistance harmonised with other budgets?," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 34(6), pages 921-931.
  2. Paul Clist & Alessia Isopi & Oliver Morrissey, 2012. "Selectivity on aid modality: Determinants of budget support from multilateral donors," The Review of International Organizations, Springer, Springer, vol. 7(3), pages 267-284, September.
  3. Helen Milner & Dustin Tingley, 2013. "The choice for multilateralism: Foreign aid and American foreign policy," The Review of International Organizations, Springer, Springer, vol. 8(3), pages 313-341, September.
  4. Martin Acht & Toman Omar Mahmoud & Rainer Thiele, 2014. "Corrupt Governments Receive Less Bilateral Aid: Governance and the Delivery of Foreign Aid through Non-Government Actors," Kiel Working Papers 1901, Kiel Institute for the World Economy.

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