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How the Millennium Development Goals are Unfair to Africa

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  • Easterly, William

Abstract

Summary Those involved in the millennium development goal (MDG) campaign routinely state "Africa will miss all the MDGs." This paper argues that a series of arbitrary choices made in defining "success" or "failure" as achieving numerical targets for the MDGs made attainment of the MDGs less likely in Africa than in other regions even when its progress was in line with or above historical or contemporary experience of other regions. The statement that "Africa will miss all the MDGs" thus has the unfortunate effect of making African successes look like failures.

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File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6VC6-4SWP267-7/2/40aaedcab89a49329cf8229d1a668168
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal World Development.

Volume (Year): 37 (2009)
Issue (Month): 1 (January)
Pages: 26-35

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Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:37:y:2009:i:1:p:26-35

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/worlddev

Related research

Keywords: human development millennium development goals poverty foreign aid Africa;

References

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  1. Michael Clemens, 2004. "The Long Walk to School: International Education Goals in Historical Perspective," Working Papers 37, Center for Global Development.
  2. Kraay, Aart, 2006. "When is growth pro-poor? Evidence from a panel of countries," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 80(1), pages 198-227, June.
  3. Kenny, Charles, 2005. "Why Are We Worried About Income? Nearly Everything that Matters is Converging," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 33(1), pages 1-19, January.
  4. Michael Clemens & Charles Kenny & Todd Moss, 2004. "The Trouble with the MDGs: Confronting Expectations of Aid and Development Success," Development and Comp Systems 0405011, EconWPA.
  5. Chen, Shaohua & Ravallion, Martin, 2004. "How Have the World's Poorest Fared Since the Early 1980s?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3341, The World Bank.
  6. Lopez, Humberto & Serven, Luis, 2006. "A normal relationship ? Poverty, growth, and inequality," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3814, The World Bank.
  7. Kakwani, N., 1990. "Poverty And Economic Growth: With Application To Cote D'Ivoire," Papers 63, World Bank - Living Standards Measurement.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Edsel Beja Jr., 2013. "Subjective Well-Being Approach to the Valuation of International Development: Evidence for the Millennium Development Goals," Social Indicators Research, Springer, vol. 111(1), pages 141-159, March.
  2. Kenneth Harttgen and Stephan Klasen, 2010. "Fragility And Mdg Progress: How Useful Is The Fragility Concept?," RSCAS Working Papers 2010/20, European University Institute.
  3. Lofgren, Hans & Cicowiez, Martin & Diaz-Bonilla, Carolina, 2013. "MAMS – A Computable General Equilibrium Model for Developing Country Strategy Analysis," Handbook of Computable General Equilibrium Modeling, Elsevier.
  4. Temple, Jonathan R.W., 2010. "Aid and Conditionality," Handbook of Development Economics, Elsevier.
  5. Ravallion, Martin, 2009. "Why don't we see poverty convergence ?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4974, The World Bank.
  6. Lofgren, Hans, 2013. "Creating and using fiscal space for accelerated development in Liberia," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6678, The World Bank.
  7. Allwine, Melanie & Rigolini, Jamele & Lopez-Calva, Luis F., 2013. "The unfairness of (poverty) targets," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6361, The World Bank.
  8. Magnoli Bocchi, Alessandro & Pontara, Nicola & Fall, Khayar & Tejada, Catalina M. & Cuervo, Pablo Gallego, 2008. "Reaching the millennium development goals : Mauritania should care," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4674, The World Bank.
  9. Charles Kenny, 2010. "Learning about Schools in Development," Working Papers id:3386, eSocialSciences.
  10. Channing Arndt & Sam Jones & Finn Tarp, 2009. "Aid and Growth: Have We Come Full Circle?," Discussion Papers 09-22, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics.
  11. Sapkota, Jeet Bahadur & Shiratori, Sakiko, 2013. "Achieving the Millennium Development Goals:Lessons for Post-2015 New Development Strategies," Working Papers 62, JICA Research Institute.
  12. Benjamin Leo, 2010. "Who Are the MDG Trailblazers? A New MDG Progress Index," Working Papers id:2926, eSocialSciences.

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