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Do not go breaking your heart: Do economic upturns really increase heart attack mortality?

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  • Svensson, Mikael

Abstract

Several recent papers in the literature have documented a pro-cyclical effect between business cycles and mortality. In this paper, I explore the relationship between business cycles and incidence, mortality and lethality in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in Sweden. The sample consists of 21 Swedish regions during the period 1987-2003. Results from the panel data estimations indicate that the business cycle effect is insignificant on overall rates of incidence, mortality and lethality. However, a counter-cyclical and significant effect is found in most specifications for those in prime working age between 20 and 49. Hence, previous recent results from the literature cannot be taken as universal for other countries or settings. It is also shown that a higher share of women, highly educated and non-foreigners decrease incidence and mortality.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Social Science & Medicine.

Volume (Year): 65 (2007)
Issue (Month): 4 (August)
Pages: 833-841

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Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:65:y:2007:i:4:p:833-841

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Keywords: Sweden Heart attacks Mortality Incidence Business cycles Economics;

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References

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Cited by:
  1. Christopher J. Ruhm, 2013. "Recessions, Healthy No More?," NBER Working Papers 19287, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Lindo, Jason M., 2013. "Aggregation and the Estimated Effects of Local Economic Conditions on Health," IZA Discussion Papers 7396, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  3. Andrea Menclova, 2013. "The Effects of Unemployment on Prenatal Care Use and Infant Health," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, Springer, vol. 34(4), pages 400-420, December.
  4. José Tapia granados, 2008. "Macroeconomic fluctuations and mortality in postwar Japan," Demography, Springer, Springer, vol. 45(2), pages 323-343, May.
  5. Niclas Kruger & Mikael Svensson, 2010. "Good times are drinking times: empirical evidence on business cycles and alcohol sales in Sweden 1861-2000," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(6), pages 543-546.
  6. Halliday, Timothy J., 2013. "Unemployment and Mortality: Evidence from the PSID," IZA Discussion Papers 7157, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  7. Tapia Granados, José A., 2012. "Economic growth and health progress in England and Wales: 160 years of a changing relation," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 74(5), pages 688-695.
  8. Layte, Richard & Nolan, Anne, 2013. "Socioeconomic Differentials in Male Mortality in Ireland: 1984-2008," Papers, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI) WP470, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).

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