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Spatial economic analysis of early detection and rapid response strategies for an invasive species

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  • Kaiser, Brooks A.
  • Burnett, Kimberly M.

Abstract

Economic impacts from invasive species, conveyed as expected damages to assets from invasion and expected costs of successful prevention and/or removal, may vary significantly across spatially differentiated landscapes. We develop a spatial-dynamic model for optimal early detection and rapid response (EDRR) policies, commonly exploited in the management of potential invaders around the world, and apply it to the case of the Brown treesnake (Boiga irregularis) in Oahu, Hawaii. EDRR consists of search activities beyond the ports of entry, where search (and potentially removal) efforts are targeted toward areas where credible evidence suggests the presence of an invader. EDRR costs are a spatially dependent variable related to the ease or difficulty of searching an area, while damages are assumed to be a population-dependent variable. A myopic strategy in which search only occurs when and where current expected net returns are positive is attractive to managers, and, we find, significantly lowers present value losses (by $270 m over 30 years). We find further that in the tradeoff between search costs and damages avoided, early and aggressive measures that search some high priority areas beyond points of entry even when current costs of search exceed current damages can save the island more ($295 m over 30 years). Extensive or non-targeted search is not advised however.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Resource and Energy Economics.

Volume (Year): 32 (2010)
Issue (Month): 4 (November)
Pages: 566-585

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Handle: RePEc:eee:resene:v:32:y:2010:i:4:p:566-585

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/505569

Related research

Keywords: Invasive species Spatial analysis Early detection and rapid response GIS Brown treesnake Hawaii;

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References

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  1. Burnett, Kimberly M. & D'Evelyn, Sean & Kaiser, Brooks A. & Nantamanasikarn, Porntawee & Roumasset, James A., 2008. "Beyond the lamppost: Optimal prevention and control of the Brown Tree Snake in Hawaii," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 67(1), pages 66-74, August.
  2. Burnett, Kimberly & Kaiser, Brooks & Roumasset, James, 2007. "Economic lessons from control efforts for an invasive species: Miconia calvescens in Hawaii," Journal of Forest Economics, Elsevier, vol. 13(2-3), pages 151-167, August.
  3. Eisenberg, Theodore, et al, 1997. "The Predictability of Punitive Damages," The Journal of Legal Studies, University of Chicago Press, vol. 26(2), pages 623-61, June.
  4. Eric J. Horsch & David J. Lewis, 2009. "The Effects of Aquatic Invasive Species on Property Values: Evidence from a Quasi-Experiment," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 85(3), pages 391-409.
  5. Olson, Lars J. & Roy, Santanu, 2005. "On Prevention and Control of an Uncertain Biological Invasion," Working Papers 28595, University of Maryland, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics.
  6. Timar, Levente & Phaneuf, Daniel J., 2009. "Modeling the human-induced spread of an aquatic invasive: The case of the zebra mussel," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(12), pages 3060-3071, October.
  7. Zivin, Joshua & Hueth, Brent M. & Zilberman, David, 2000. "Managing a Multiple-Use Resource: The Case of Feral Pig Management in California Rangeland," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 39(2), pages 189-204, March.
  8. Kaiser, Brooks A. & Burnett, Kimberly M. & Roumasset, James A., 2006. "Control of Invasive Species: Lessons from Miconia in Hawaii," 2006 Annual meeting, July 23-26, Long Beach, CA 21301, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  9. Loomis, John B. & White, Douglas S., 1996. "Economic benefits of rare and endangered species: summary and meta-analysis," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(3), pages 197-206, September.
  10. Finnoff, David & Shogren, Jason F. & Leung, Brian & Lodge, David, 2007. "Take a risk: Preferring prevention over control of biological invaders," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 62(2), pages 216-222, April.
  11. Mark Eiswerth & Wayne Johnson, 2002. "Managing Nonindigenous Invasive Species: Insights from Dynamic Analysis," Environmental & Resource Economics, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 23(3), pages 319-342, November.
  12. Shogren, Jason F. & Finnoff, David C. & McIntosh, Christopher R. & Settle, Chad, 2006. "Integration-Valuation Nexus in Invasive Species Policy," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association, vol. 35(1), April.
  13. James E. Wilen, 2007. "Economics of Spatial-Dynamic Processes," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 89(5), pages 1134-1144.
  14. Burnett, Kimberly M. & Kaiser, Brooks A. & Pitafi, Basharat A.K. & Roumasset, James A., 2006. "Prevention, Eradication, and Containment of Invasive Species: Illustrations from Hawaii," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association, vol. 35(1), April.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Hyytiäinen, Kari & Lehtiniemi, Maiju & Niemi, Jarkko K. & Tikka, Kimmo, 2013. "An optimization framework for addressing aquatic invasive species," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 91(C), pages 69-79.
  2. Kovacs, Kent F. & Haight, Robert G. & Mercader, Rodrigo J. & McCullough, Deborah G., 2014. "A bioeconomic analysis of an emerald ash borer invasion of an urban forest with multiple jurisdictions," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(1), pages 270-289.

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