Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

Are corruption levels accurately identified? The case of U.S. states

Contents:

Author Info

  • Neiva de Figueiredo, João
Registered author(s):

    Abstract

    This paper applies a novel methodology to measure corruption levels in U.S. states, leading to insights which could be useful to policymakers in their effort to reduce unethical behavior. The level of public corruption is difficult to quantify because much of it goes undetected and because different cultures and jurisdictions have different definitions and different degrees of tolerance for corruption. When comparing corruption across countries, in the absence of another solution, this difficulty has been addressed by using survey-based methods. Within countries, because of the greater homogeneity in culture, institutions, and legal frameworks, other measures have been used, such as public official convictions per capita. This paper suggests that even these more objective measures of corruption may lead to distortions, describes an alternative methodology based on the analysis of public official non-compliance as compared to general population non-compliance, and illustrates its use. The method is based on modeling an institution as a system (and corruption as a failure in that system) and using time-tested statistical quality control techniques to examine its incidence. When applied to states of the U.S. Union, the methodology flags some states as more corrupt than estimated through other methods and, conversely, identifies other states as less corrupt than anticipated. The paper thus offers a tool and suggestions to support policy-makers in their efforts to evaluate the prevalence of unethical practices and to reduce corruption levels.

    Download Info

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0161893812000166
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Policy Modeling.

    Volume (Year): 35 (2013)
    Issue (Month): 1 ()
    Pages: 134-149

    as in new window
    Handle: RePEc:eee:jpolmo:v:35:y:2013:i:1:p:134-149

    Contact details of provider:
    Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/505735

    Related research

    Keywords: Corruption; Institutional maturity; Compliance; Accountability; Ethics in the U.S.;

    Find related papers by JEL classification:

    References

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
    as in new window
    1. Axel Dreher & Friedrich Schneider, 2006. "Corruption and the Shadow Economy: An Empirical Analysis," CESifo Working Paper Series 1653, CESifo Group Munich.
    2. Pierre-Guillaume Méon & Khalid Sekkat, 2005. "Does corruption grease or sand the wheels of growth?," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 122(1), pages 69-97, January.
    3. Mauro, Paolo, 1995. "Corruption and Growth," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 110(3), pages 681-712, August.
    4. Mauro, Paolo, 1998. "Corruption and the composition of government expenditure," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(2), pages 263-279, June.
    5. Fisman, Raymond & Gatti, Roberta, 2002. "Decentralization and corruption: evidence across countries," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 83(3), pages 325-345, March.
    6. Goel, Rajeev K. & Nelson, Michael A., 2010. "Causes of corruption: History, geography and government," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 32(4), pages 433-447, July.
    7. Beck, Paul J. & Maher, Michael W., 1986. "A comparison of bribery and bidding in thin markets," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 20(1), pages 1-5.
    8. Glaeser, Edward L. & Saks, Raven E., 2006. "Corruption in America," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 90(6-7), pages 1053-1072, August.
    9. Arin, K. Peren & Chmelarova, Viera & Feess, Eberhard & Wohlschlegel, Ansgar, 2011. "Why are corrupt countries less successful in consolidating their budgets?," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 95(7-8), pages 521-530, August.
    10. Lalountas, Dionisios A. & Manolas, George A. & Vavouras, Ioannis S., 2011. "Corruption, globalization and development: How are these three phenomena related?," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 33(4), pages 636-648, July.
    11. Alexander W. Butler & Larry Fauver & Sandra Mortal, 2009. "Corruption, Political Connections, and Municipal Finance," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 22(7), pages 2673-2705, July.
    12. Jain, Arvind K, 2001. " Corruption: A Review," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 15(1), pages 71-121, February.
    13. Nicholas Apergis & Oguzhan Dincer & James Payne, 2010. "The relationship between corruption and income inequality in U.S. states: evidence from a panel cointegration and error correction model," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 145(1), pages 125-135, October.
    14. Mushfiq Swaleheen, 2011. "Economic growth with endogenous corruption: an empirical study," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 146(1), pages 23-41, January.
    15. Colombatto, Enrico, 1998. "An Institutional View of LDC Failure," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 20(5), pages 631-648, October.
    16. Alguacil, M. & Cuadros, A. & Orts, V., 2011. "Inward FDI and growth: The role of macroeconomic and institutional environment," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 33(3), pages 481-496, May.
    17. Craig Depken & Courtney Lafountain, 2006. "Fiscal consequences of public corruption: Empirical evidence from state bond ratings," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 126(1), pages 75-85, January.
    18. Lien, Da-Hsiang Donald, 1986. "A note on competitive bribery games," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 22(4), pages 337-341.
    19. Goel, Rajeev K. & Nelson, Michael A., 2007. "Are corrupt acts contagious?: Evidence from the United States," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 29(6), pages 839-850.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Lists

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:jpolmo:v:35:y:2013:i:1:p:134-149. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Zhang, Lei).

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.