Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

Racial earnings inequality in South Africa: An assessment of policy options

Contents:

Author Info

  • O'Gorman, Melanie

Abstract

The model developed in this paper illustrates how grade repetition and unemployment shocks may culminate in a skill gap and consequently a wage gap across races. I calibrate the model to South African data in the early 1990s, and use this calibrated model to provide insight into the quantitative significance of various policies on the wage gap in the South African context. The policy experiments suggest that an enrolment subsidy or the provision of income support to the unemployed would bring long-run reductions in the African-white wage gap of 22% and 5%, respectively.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6V82-50X3TPW-1/2/e1c989dd0abf58774427434a16183f15
Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Policy Modeling.

Volume (Year): 32 (2010)
Issue (Month): 6 (November)
Pages: 703-718

as in new window
Handle: RePEc:eee:jpolmo:v:32:y::i:6:p:703-718

Contact details of provider:
Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/505735

Related research

Keywords: Educational finance Economics of minorities and races Non-labor discrimination Computable and other applied general equilibrium models;

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Anne Case & Motohiro Yogo, 1999. "Does School Quality Matter? Returns to Education and the Characteristics of Schools in South Africa," Working Papers 219, Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Research Program in Development Studies..
  2. Pundy Pillay, 2006. "Human resource development and growth: improving access to and equity in the provision of education and health services in South Africa," Development Southern Africa, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 23(1), pages 63-83.
  3. Stephan Klasen & Ingrid Woolard, 2009. "Surviving Unemployment Without State Support: Unemployment and Household Formation in South Africa," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 18(1), pages 1-51, January.
  4. Hubbard, R. Glenn & Skinner, Jonathan & Zeldes, Stephen P., 1994. "The importance of precautionary motives in explaining individual and aggregate saving," Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 59-125, June.
  5. Selod, Harris & Zenou, Yves, 2002. "Private versus Public Schools in Post-Apartheid South African Cities: Theory and Policy Implications," CEPR Discussion Papers 3358, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  6. Yamauchi, Futoshi, 2005. "Race, equity, and public schools in post-Apartheid South Africa: Equal opportunity for all kids," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 24(2), pages 213-233, April.
  7. Jeffrey Frankel & Ben Smit & Federico Sturzenegger, 2008. "South Africa: Macroeconomic challenges after a decade of success," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 16(4), pages 639-677, October.
  8. Diego Restuccia & Carlos Urrutia, 2002. "Intergenerational Persistence of Earnings: The Role of Early and College Education," Working Papers 0209, Centro de Investigacion Economica, ITAM.
  9. Card, David & Krueger, Alan B, 1992. "Does School Quality Matter? Returns to Education and the Characteristics of Public Schools in the United States," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 100(1), pages 1-40, February.
  10. T. Paul Schultz, 2004. "Evidence of Returns to Schooling in Africa from Household Surveys: Monitoring and Restructuring the Market for Education," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 13(02), pages ii95-ii148, December.
  11. Robert E. Hall, 1978. "A Theory of the Natural Unemployment Rate and the Duration of Employment," NBER Working Papers 0251, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  12. Crouch, Luis A., 1996. "Public education equity and efficiency in South Africa: Lessons for other countries," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 15(2), pages 125-137, April.
  13. Geeta Kingdon & John Knight, 2001. "Race and the Incidence of Unemployment in South Africa," CSAE Working Paper Series 2001-18, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
  14. Brahima Coulibaly & Trevon D. Logan, 2009. "South Africa's post-apartheid two-step: social demands versus macro stability," International Finance Discussion Papers 974, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  15. Salim Vally, 2007. "From People's Education to Neo-Liberalism in South Africa," Review of African Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(111), pages 39-56, March.
  16. Marais, M. A., 1995. "The distribution of resources in education in South Africa," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 14(1), pages 47-52, March.
  17. Rulof Burger & Rachel Jafta, 2006. "Returns to Race: Labour Market Discrimination in Post-Apartheid South Africa," Working Papers 04/2006, Stellenbosch University, Department of Economics.
  18. Keane, Michael P & Wolpin, Kenneth I, 2001. "The Effect of Parental Transfers and Borrowing Constraints on Educational Attainment," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 42(4), pages 1051-1103, November.
  19. Gerhard Glomm & Michael Kaganovich, 2003. "Distributional Effects of Public Education in an Economy with Public Pensions," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 44(3), pages 917-937, 08.
  20. Anne Case & Angus Deaton, 1999. "School Inputs And Educational Outcomes In South Africa," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 114(3), pages 1047-1084, August.
  21. Ana Castaneda & Javier Diaz-Gimenez & Jose-Victor Rios-Rull, 2003. "Accounting for the U.S. Earnings and Wealth Inequality," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 111(4), pages 818-857, August.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:jpolmo:v:32:y::i:6:p:703-718. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Zhang, Lei).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.