Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

Long-term employment effects of surviving cancer

Contents:

Author Info

  • Moran, John R.
  • Short, Pamela Farley
  • Hollenbeak, Christopher S.
Registered author(s):

    Abstract

    We compare employment and usual hours of work for prime-age cancer survivors from the Penn State Cancer Survivor Survey to a comparison group drawn from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics using cross-sectional and difference-in-differences regression and matching estimators. Because earlier research has emphasized workers diagnosed at older ages, we focus on employment effects for younger workers. We find that as long as two to six years after diagnosis, cancer survivors have lower employment rates and work fewer hours than other similarly aged adults.

    Download Info

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0167629611000257
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Health Economics.

    Volume (Year): 30 (2011)
    Issue (Month): 3 (May)
    Pages: 505-514

    as in new window
    Handle: RePEc:eee:jhecon:v:30:y:2011:i:3:p:505-514

    Contact details of provider:
    Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/505560

    Related research

    Keywords: Cancer Employment Matching;

    References

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
    as in new window
    1. Alberto Abadie & Guido W. Imbens, 2008. "On the Failure of the Bootstrap for Matching Estimators," Econometrica, Econometric Society, Econometric Society, vol. 76(6), pages 1537-1557, November.
    2. Tommaso Nannicini, 2006. "A Simulation-Based Sensitivity Analysis for Matching Estimators," North American Stata Users' Group Meetings 2006, Stata Users Group 6, Stata Users Group.
    3. Ichino, Andrea & Mealli, Fabrizia & Nannicini, Tommaso, 2006. "From Temporary Help Jobs to Permanent Employment: What Can We Learn from Matching Estimators and their Sensitivity?," CEPR Discussion Papers, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers 5736, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    4. Bradley, Cathy J. & Neumark, David & Bednarek, Heather L. & Schenk, Maryjean, 2005. "Short-term effects of breast cancer on labor market attachment: results from a longitudinal study," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 24(1), pages 137-160, January.
    5. James Heckman & Hidehiko Ichimura & Jeffrey Smith & Petra Todd, 1998. "Characterizing Selection Bias Using Experimental Data," Econometrica, Econometric Society, Econometric Society, vol. 66(5), pages 1017-1098, September.
    6. Cathy J. Bradley & Heather Bednarek & David Neumark, 2001. "Breast Cancer Survival, Work, and Earnings," NBER Working Papers 8134, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Heckman, James J. & Robb, Richard Jr., 1985. "Alternative methods for evaluating the impact of interventions : An overview," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 30(1-2), pages 239-267.
    8. Heckman, James J & Ichimura, Hidehiko & Todd, Petra E, 1997. "Matching as an Econometric Evaluation Estimator: Evidence from Evaluating a Job Training Programme," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 64(4), pages 605-54, October.
    9. Markus Frölich, 2004. "Finite-Sample Properties of Propensity-Score Matching and Weighting Estimators," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 86(1), pages 77-90, February.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as in new window

    Cited by:
    1. David Candon, 2014. "The Effects of Cancer in the English Labour Market," Working Papers, School Of Economics, University College Dublin 201409, School Of Economics, University College Dublin.
    2. Emmanuel Duguet & Christine Le Clainche, 2012. "Une évaluation de l'impact de l'aménagement des conditions de travail sur la reprise du travail après un cancer," Working Papers halshs-00712039, HAL.
    3. Heinesen, Eskil & Kolodziejczyk, Christophe, 2013. "Effects of breast and colorectal cancer on labour market outcomes—Average effects and educational gradients," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 32(6), pages 1028-1042.

    Lists

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:jhecon:v:30:y:2011:i:3:p:505-514. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Zhang, Lei).

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.